2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165351
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Women Who Say No to Mammography
Author(s):
Michaels, C.
Author Details:
C. Michaels, University of Arizona College of Nursing, Tucson, Arizona, USA
Abstract:
This qualitative research study is relevant for clinical practice, specifically dialogue with women related to self-care practice of regular mammograms Purpose: This qualitative research study is relevant for clinical practice, specifically dialogue with women related to regular mammograms. Mammography is not a self-care practice for all insured women, despite growing public knowledge of the importance of screening. Understanding why is significant for women’s health, because early detection improves treatment outcomes. Although phenomenology could document thoughts and feelings related to screening, no studies were identified in the literature. This study was designed to explore the meaning of not regularly participating in mammograms by insured women with a mammography benefit. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: The philosophical frame of reference was existentialism which informs hermeneutic interpretive phenomenology. Methods: Ten women, forty years and older were recruited as a convenience sample and interviewed about their mammography and health practices. Data Analysis: Audio-taped interviews were transcribed, reviewed and analyzed using the hermeneutic interpretive method. Central concerns were constructed for each participant. Shared meanings were then identified across participants and an overall interpretive meaning was identified that reflected the analyzed data. To augment trustworthiness, a consultant reviewed and concurred with the analyzed data. Findings and Implications: Participants consciously decided if and when to get mammograms and desired to be acknowledged for health decisions and practices. Shared meanings included the following: belief in being at low risk, trusting own conclusions, self as expert, responsibility for own health, broadly defining health, and the mammogram process as a deterrent. Overall, the shared meaning of not participating in mammography on a regular basis reflected each woman’s individuality and her confidence in her own decisions. The results of this study offered insight into individual perspectives and self-care shaped by the value for self, a mode of inquiry and personal health. This study affirms the value of nurses and other clinicians engaging women in meaningful dialogue to understand individual perspectives, to offer the latest scientific rationale for mammograms in the information mode most valued by each woman, and to negotiate the most protective self-care practice while respecting each woman’s perspective, values and beliefs.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Orlando, Florida, USA
Sponsors:
Funding Sources: Sponsored by ONS Foundation and Bristol-Myers Community Research Grant
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWomen Who Say No to Mammographyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMichaels, C.en_US
dc.author.detailsC. Michaels, University of Arizona College of Nursing, Tucson, Arizona, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165351-
dc.description.abstractThis qualitative research study is relevant for clinical practice, specifically dialogue with women related to self-care practice of regular mammograms Purpose: This qualitative research study is relevant for clinical practice, specifically dialogue with women related to regular mammograms. Mammography is not a self-care practice for all insured women, despite growing public knowledge of the importance of screening. Understanding why is significant for women’s health, because early detection improves treatment outcomes. Although phenomenology could document thoughts and feelings related to screening, no studies were identified in the literature. This study was designed to explore the meaning of not regularly participating in mammograms by insured women with a mammography benefit. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: The philosophical frame of reference was existentialism which informs hermeneutic interpretive phenomenology. Methods: Ten women, forty years and older were recruited as a convenience sample and interviewed about their mammography and health practices. Data Analysis: Audio-taped interviews were transcribed, reviewed and analyzed using the hermeneutic interpretive method. Central concerns were constructed for each participant. Shared meanings were then identified across participants and an overall interpretive meaning was identified that reflected the analyzed data. To augment trustworthiness, a consultant reviewed and concurred with the analyzed data. Findings and Implications: Participants consciously decided if and when to get mammograms and desired to be acknowledged for health decisions and practices. Shared meanings included the following: belief in being at low risk, trusting own conclusions, self as expert, responsibility for own health, broadly defining health, and the mammogram process as a deterrent. Overall, the shared meaning of not participating in mammography on a regular basis reflected each woman’s individuality and her confidence in her own decisions. The results of this study offered insight into individual perspectives and self-care shaped by the value for self, a mode of inquiry and personal health. This study affirms the value of nurses and other clinicians engaging women in meaningful dialogue to understand individual perspectives, to offer the latest scientific rationale for mammograms in the information mode most valued by each woman, and to negotiate the most protective self-care practice while respecting each woman’s perspective, values and beliefs.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:16:59Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:16:59Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationOrlando, Florida, USAen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipFunding Sources: Sponsored by ONS Foundation and Bristol-Myers Community Research Grant-
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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