Information Seeking Behavior Among Individuals Receiving Treatment for Cancer

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165353
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Information Seeking Behavior Among Individuals Receiving Treatment for Cancer
Author(s):
Mraz, L.
Author Details:
L. Mraz, The Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick , New Jersey, USA
Abstract:
Educating patients is a critical function of oncology nurses; it is imperative for individuals with cancer to understand the disease, treatment, and the physical, psychological, and social impact. Yet, how do nurses determine how much information to provide? Purpose: This study determined factors that influence information seeking among individuals receiving cancer treatment, and identified components of the information seeking process. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: According to Lenz’s conceptual framework of health information seeking, potential predictors of variations in search behaviors are background, personality, context, and social network. This research focused on the first step, desire for information. Methods: Descriptive design in which a purposive sample of 108 adult patients, at an ambulatory NCI-designated comprehensive cancer center, completed a demographic survey, the Krantz Health Opinion Survey, and one open ended question. Mean age was 55 years. The majority of subjects were female (61%), Caucasian (78.1%), had a college degree or greater (57.3%), had breast (24.8%) or hematological (24.8%) cancers, and were diagnosed less than six months (31.4%). Data Analysis: Data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. Qualitative data were coded for themes. Findings and Implications: The majority of subjects preferred information. Culture, length of time since diagnosis, and levels of education did not influence preference for information. Females preferred more information as compared to males. Emerging themes about the information search process revealed that information seeking is not an individual process, but a group effort with the group composed primarily of family. The Internet was the primary source for seeking information. The major topic searched for was cancer specific information. Findings suggest that education should involve the family system, all of whom want information when a diagnosis of a cancer is present. Patients and families need to be informed about credible resources, and how to determine if information is trustworthy, especially on the Internet. Nurses are a critical resource to patients and family members. Findings support that the development of education resources and learning centers may assist with the information search process.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Orlando, Florida, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleInformation Seeking Behavior Among Individuals Receiving Treatment for Canceren_GB
dc.contributor.authorMraz, L.en_US
dc.author.detailsL. Mraz, The Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick , New Jersey, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165353-
dc.description.abstractEducating patients is a critical function of oncology nurses; it is imperative for individuals with cancer to understand the disease, treatment, and the physical, psychological, and social impact. Yet, how do nurses determine how much information to provide? Purpose: This study determined factors that influence information seeking among individuals receiving cancer treatment, and identified components of the information seeking process. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: According to Lenz’s conceptual framework of health information seeking, potential predictors of variations in search behaviors are background, personality, context, and social network. This research focused on the first step, desire for information. Methods: Descriptive design in which a purposive sample of 108 adult patients, at an ambulatory NCI-designated comprehensive cancer center, completed a demographic survey, the Krantz Health Opinion Survey, and one open ended question. Mean age was 55 years. The majority of subjects were female (61%), Caucasian (78.1%), had a college degree or greater (57.3%), had breast (24.8%) or hematological (24.8%) cancers, and were diagnosed less than six months (31.4%). Data Analysis: Data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. Qualitative data were coded for themes. Findings and Implications: The majority of subjects preferred information. Culture, length of time since diagnosis, and levels of education did not influence preference for information. Females preferred more information as compared to males. Emerging themes about the information search process revealed that information seeking is not an individual process, but a group effort with the group composed primarily of family. The Internet was the primary source for seeking information. The major topic searched for was cancer specific information. Findings suggest that education should involve the family system, all of whom want information when a diagnosis of a cancer is present. Patients and families need to be informed about credible resources, and how to determine if information is trustworthy, especially on the Internet. Nurses are a critical resource to patients and family members. Findings support that the development of education resources and learning centers may assist with the information search process.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:17:02Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:17:02Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationOrlando, Florida, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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