Lung Cancer Patients Perceptions of Their Awareness of Treatment Options, Self-Assessment of Knowledge and Level of Satisfaction With Pretreatment Education

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165355
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Lung Cancer Patients Perceptions of Their Awareness of Treatment Options, Self-Assessment of Knowledge and Level of Satisfaction With Pretreatment Education
Author(s):
Petersen, J.; Davis, B.
Author Details:
J. Petersen, NexCura, Inc., Seattle, Washington, USA; B. Davis
Abstract:
Treatment decision-making is complex. It is important for oncology nurses providing education to newly diagnosed patients of varying age, education, and socioeconomic status to understand patients' experiences and factors influencing treatment decision-making. Purpose: Lung cancer patients, families, and caregivers make important treatment-option decisions at the time of diagnosis. Limited research is available to explain their treatment decision-making process and informational needs. Multiple factors may influence access to information, satisfaction with information provided, and treatment choice. This study was initiated to describe patients' perceptions of knowledge and satisfaction with treatment-options education. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: The ONS Position Paper on Patients' Bill of Rights for Quality Cancer Care affirms patients' right to access the full spectrum of appropriate treatment options with active, informed participation in treatment decision making. Methods: Respondents were invited to complete an online survey about their level of knowledge and satisfaction with education regarding various treatment options. The population was developed by e-mail invitation to registrants of NexCura®'s online NexProfiler™ Treatment Option Tool for Lung Cancer, sent 3 - 9 months after patients' use of the tool. New registrants will be invited to take the survey 3 months after using the Tool until March 2005. Data Analysis: Patient responses will be compared across treatment type, stage, age, education, and income level. Findings and Implications: 671 of 6000 surveys (13% of NSCLC registrants, and 9% SCLC) were completed and returned within 2 weeks. We anticipate another 600 completed surveys by March 2005 totaling approximately 1300 responses. Preliminary findings: Patients over the age of 70 felt well or very well informed less often than patients under 70 (42% vs. 50%). Patients felt more informed about chemotherapy than other modalities (age >70, 59% felt informed; age< 70, 69%) and least informed about investigational drugs (age>70, 16% vs. age <70, 23%). From survey participants' comments (N=467), 3 themes emerged: 1) a plea for greater compassion from healthcare professionals; 2) frustration and misunderstandings reflecting ineffective communication between providers and patients; and 3) a request for truth telling and honesty regarding treatment side effects and prognosis. Awareness of factors that influence access to and satisfaction with information can help nurses tailor individual patients’ learning experience.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Orlando, Florida, USA
Sponsors:
Funding Sources: NexCura is a health care education and information company that develops Web-based, clinical decision-support applications called NexCura NexProfilers(tm). The authors are clinical specialists employed by NexCura, Inc
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleLung Cancer Patients Perceptions of Their Awareness of Treatment Options, Self-Assessment of Knowledge and Level of Satisfaction With Pretreatment Educationen_GB
dc.contributor.authorPetersen, J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDavis, B.en_US
dc.author.detailsJ. Petersen, NexCura, Inc., Seattle, Washington, USA; B. Davisen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165355-
dc.description.abstractTreatment decision-making is complex. It is important for oncology nurses providing education to newly diagnosed patients of varying age, education, and socioeconomic status to understand patients' experiences and factors influencing treatment decision-making. Purpose: Lung cancer patients, families, and caregivers make important treatment-option decisions at the time of diagnosis. Limited research is available to explain their treatment decision-making process and informational needs. Multiple factors may influence access to information, satisfaction with information provided, and treatment choice. This study was initiated to describe patients' perceptions of knowledge and satisfaction with treatment-options education. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: The ONS Position Paper on Patients' Bill of Rights for Quality Cancer Care affirms patients' right to access the full spectrum of appropriate treatment options with active, informed participation in treatment decision making. Methods: Respondents were invited to complete an online survey about their level of knowledge and satisfaction with education regarding various treatment options. The population was developed by e-mail invitation to registrants of NexCura&reg;'s online NexProfiler&trade; Treatment Option Tool for Lung Cancer, sent 3 - 9 months after patients' use of the tool. New registrants will be invited to take the survey 3 months after using the Tool until March 2005. Data Analysis: Patient responses will be compared across treatment type, stage, age, education, and income level. Findings and Implications: 671 of 6000 surveys (13% of NSCLC registrants, and 9% SCLC) were completed and returned within 2 weeks. We anticipate another 600 completed surveys by March 2005 totaling approximately 1300 responses. Preliminary findings: Patients over the age of 70 felt well or very well informed less often than patients under 70 (42% vs. 50%). Patients felt more informed about chemotherapy than other modalities (age &gt;70, 59% felt informed; age&lt; 70, 69%) and least informed about investigational drugs (age&gt;70, 16% vs. age &lt;70, 23%). From survey participants' comments (N=467), 3 themes emerged: 1) a plea for greater compassion from healthcare professionals; 2) frustration and misunderstandings reflecting ineffective communication between providers and patients; and 3) a request for truth telling and honesty regarding treatment side effects and prognosis. Awareness of factors that influence access to and satisfaction with information can help nurses tailor individual patients&rsquo; learning experience.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:17:04Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:17:04Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationOrlando, Florida, USAen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipFunding Sources: NexCura is a health care education and information company that develops Web-based, clinical decision-support applications called NexCura NexProfilers(tm). The authors are clinical specialists employed by NexCura, Inc-
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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