Complementary and Alternative Medicine: Oncology Nurses Knowledge, Attitude, and Experience

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165357
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Complementary and Alternative Medicine: Oncology Nurses Knowledge, Attitude, and Experience
Author(s):
Rojas-Cooley, T.; Grant, M.; Juarez, G.; Perez, M.; Decker, G.
Author Details:
T. Rojas-Cooley, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California, USA; M. Grant; G. Juarez; M. Perez; G. Decker
Abstract:
Purpose: CAM use in the oncology population has increased from 30% to 83% yet disclosure rate to the healthcare professionals by patients has not. Interference, adverse effects, or injury may occur when there is a failure to discover a patient’s use of CAM with conventional treatment. Primary reasons reported by patients for nondisclosure are lack of professional inquiry and /or fear of disapproval. Paucity exists in the literature that describe the pattern of communication between nurses and patients. The aim of this study is to describe the knowledge, attitude, and experience of the oncology nurse with CAM. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: Principles of Adult Education, CAM Therapy Content, and Change Theory provide direction in the development and implementation of this study and will contribute to the long-range goal of education. Methods: This descriptive study used a one-time self-administered mailed packet that included an invitation to participate, demographic questionnaire, and the Nurse Complementary and Alternative Knowledge and Attitude Survey (Nr CAM K&A). It was mailed to a random sample of Oncology Nursing Society Registered Nurse members who are involved in direct patient care. Data Analysis: A total of 3,637 packets were mailed. 865 were received and 850 were analyzed. Initial results indicate a majority of direct patient care nurses are uncomfortable answering questions about CAM therapies and do not assess patients for CAM use yet they believe patients have the right to integrate conventional medicine with CAM therapies. In addition, a majority of participants believe CAM therapies have a role in their nursing practice and deem CAM education to be very important even though a vast majority were unfamiliar with the ONS CAM position statement or their Board of Registered Nursing CAM advisory statement. Findings and Implications: Direct patient care nurses need to support the growing numbers of cancer patients already using CAM. The priority for direct patient care nurses is education to help integrate evidence-based CAM therapies into standard oncology nursing practice. Prepared with the right knowledge, not only can the oncology nurses assess for potential problems with CAM usage but also support safe therapies that promote increased quality of life to their patients.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Orlando, Florida, USA
Sponsors:
Funding Sources: Oncology Nursing Society Foundation/Ortho Biotech Novice Researcher Grant. May 2003-05.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleComplementary and Alternative Medicine: Oncology Nurses Knowledge, Attitude, and Experienceen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRojas-Cooley, T.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGrant, M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorJuarez, G.en_US
dc.contributor.authorPerez, M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDecker, G.en_US
dc.author.detailsT. Rojas-Cooley, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California, USA; M. Grant; G. Juarez; M. Perez; G. Deckeren_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165357-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: CAM use in the oncology population has increased from 30% to 83% yet disclosure rate to the healthcare professionals by patients has not. Interference, adverse effects, or injury may occur when there is a failure to discover a patient’s use of CAM with conventional treatment. Primary reasons reported by patients for nondisclosure are lack of professional inquiry and /or fear of disapproval. Paucity exists in the literature that describe the pattern of communication between nurses and patients. The aim of this study is to describe the knowledge, attitude, and experience of the oncology nurse with CAM. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: Principles of Adult Education, CAM Therapy Content, and Change Theory provide direction in the development and implementation of this study and will contribute to the long-range goal of education. Methods: This descriptive study used a one-time self-administered mailed packet that included an invitation to participate, demographic questionnaire, and the Nurse Complementary and Alternative Knowledge and Attitude Survey (Nr CAM K&A). It was mailed to a random sample of Oncology Nursing Society Registered Nurse members who are involved in direct patient care. Data Analysis: A total of 3,637 packets were mailed. 865 were received and 850 were analyzed. Initial results indicate a majority of direct patient care nurses are uncomfortable answering questions about CAM therapies and do not assess patients for CAM use yet they believe patients have the right to integrate conventional medicine with CAM therapies. In addition, a majority of participants believe CAM therapies have a role in their nursing practice and deem CAM education to be very important even though a vast majority were unfamiliar with the ONS CAM position statement or their Board of Registered Nursing CAM advisory statement. Findings and Implications: Direct patient care nurses need to support the growing numbers of cancer patients already using CAM. The priority for direct patient care nurses is education to help integrate evidence-based CAM therapies into standard oncology nursing practice. Prepared with the right knowledge, not only can the oncology nurses assess for potential problems with CAM usage but also support safe therapies that promote increased quality of life to their patients.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:17:06Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:17:06Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationOrlando, Florida, USAen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipFunding Sources: Oncology Nursing Society Foundation/Ortho Biotech Novice Researcher Grant. May 2003-05.-
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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