2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165358
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
You Just Have to Be Strong
Author(s):
Rosenzweig, M.; Rosenfield, R.; Alt, H.
Author Details:
M. Rosenzweig, University of Pittsburgh, SON, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA; R. Rosenfield; H. Alt
Abstract:
Mortality rates of African American (AA) women continue to exceed that of white women. There is consensus that survival equalization efforts should be focused on ensuring racially equivalent breast cancer treatment intensity. Purpose: The specific aims of the study were: 1.To identify the patient based barriers (PBB) to symptom management strategies perceived by patients with MBC and 2.To determine if PBB to symptom management strategies differs according to income and/or race. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: One potential cause for healthcare disparity is such as adherence to appointments, prescriptions and advice. This explanation is best derived from the individual's own words and experiences. The findings from this study begin to describe the PBB to treatment and symptom management adherence according to race (White (W) or AA) and income (2003 Health and Human Services Income Guide) for women with MBC. This beginning explanatory model will help to tailor interventions so that intensive palliative chemotherapy and/or supportive care be can ensured for all women with MBC. Methods: Qualitative research methodology based on open ended interviews of fourteen women with MBC (8 white – 6 high income (HI), 2 low income (LI), 7AA– 2 (HI), 5 (LI)) undergoing MBC therapy was conducted. The interviews were transcribed and analyzed for recurrent themes exploring possible patient based barriers to treatment adherence or symptom management using investigator coding and Ethnograph qualitative software (v.5). Data Analysis: In this preliminary analysis two overarching themes for all women and three racially differential themes served as explanatory models for PBB to treatment and symptom management adherence in MBC. The overarching barriers to treatment and symptom management adherence were 1) questions of treatment futility for metastatic disease 2) symptom distress (pain and depression) and 3) time and expense of health related care. The racially specific barriers to treatment and symptom management for LI AA women were 1) need for minimization of symptoms (multiple roles and family optimism) and 2) stressors of poverty. Both HIAA and LI AA women noted 1) poor understanding of illness severity. Findings and Implications: This analysis is rich with cancer nursing implications. Interventions to increase adherence need to have particular attention to the differential burden that sociodemographic factors bring to the MBC experience.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Orlando, Florida, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleYou Just Have to Be Strongen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRosenzweig, M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorRosenfield, R.en_US
dc.contributor.authorAlt, H.en_US
dc.author.detailsM. Rosenzweig, University of Pittsburgh, SON, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA; R. Rosenfield; H. Alten_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165358-
dc.description.abstractMortality rates of African American (AA) women continue to exceed that of white women. There is consensus that survival equalization efforts should be focused on ensuring racially equivalent breast cancer treatment intensity. Purpose: The specific aims of the study were: 1.To identify the patient based barriers (PBB) to symptom management strategies perceived by patients with MBC and 2.To determine if PBB to symptom management strategies differs according to income and/or race. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: One potential cause for healthcare disparity is such as adherence to appointments, prescriptions and advice. This explanation is best derived from the individual's own words and experiences. The findings from this study begin to describe the PBB to treatment and symptom management adherence according to race (White (W) or AA) and income (2003 Health and Human Services Income Guide) for women with MBC. This beginning explanatory model will help to tailor interventions so that intensive palliative chemotherapy and/or supportive care be can ensured for all women with MBC. Methods: Qualitative research methodology based on open ended interviews of fourteen women with MBC (8 white – 6 high income (HI), 2 low income (LI), 7AA– 2 (HI), 5 (LI)) undergoing MBC therapy was conducted. The interviews were transcribed and analyzed for recurrent themes exploring possible patient based barriers to treatment adherence or symptom management using investigator coding and Ethnograph qualitative software (v.5). Data Analysis: In this preliminary analysis two overarching themes for all women and three racially differential themes served as explanatory models for PBB to treatment and symptom management adherence in MBC. The overarching barriers to treatment and symptom management adherence were 1) questions of treatment futility for metastatic disease 2) symptom distress (pain and depression) and 3) time and expense of health related care. The racially specific barriers to treatment and symptom management for LI AA women were 1) need for minimization of symptoms (multiple roles and family optimism) and 2) stressors of poverty. Both HIAA and LI AA women noted 1) poor understanding of illness severity. Findings and Implications: This analysis is rich with cancer nursing implications. Interventions to increase adherence need to have particular attention to the differential burden that sociodemographic factors bring to the MBC experience.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:17:07Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:17:07Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationOrlando, Florida, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.