2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165359
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Profile on Cancer Related Symptoms Prior to Chemotherapy
Author(s):
Rowe, K.; Schneider, S.; Edwards-Hoods, L
Author Details:
K. Rowe, Duke U. Health System Ed. Services, Durham, North Carolina, USA; S. Schneider; L. Edwards-Hoods
Abstract:
Management of patient symptoms is an integral component of oncology nursing care. Patient reports of symptoms are essential for guiding both the diagnosis and treatment of all types of cancer. The majority of literature on cancer patient symptoms focuses on treatment related side effects. Very little attention has focused on baseline symptoms that patients present with prior to the initiation of treatment. Purpose: This study is to identify a profile of symptoms experienced by patients with breast, lung, and colon cancer experience before beginning a chemotherapy regimen. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: Symptom distress is defined as a general indicator of symptoms experienced by cancer patients (McCorkle &Young, 1978). Symptom distress or discomfort stemming from symptoms interferes with a person's ability to perform activities of daily living and affects quality of life (Grant, 1997; Macquart-Moulin, 1999; Pickett, 1991). Methods: Secondary analysis of baseline data from an intervention study to reduce chemotherapy-related symptom distress in 90 adults receiving chemotherapy for breast, colon, or lung cancer at Duke University Comprehensive Cancer Center. Participants completed The Adapted Symptom Distress Scale-2 immediately prior to receiving their first chemotherapy treatment. Patients had not received any prior chemotherapy or radiation treatments. The ASDS-2 has demonstrated reliability and validity in this population. Data Analysis: Descriptive Statistics and frequency analysis used to identify the most commonly reported symptoms. Baseline symptoms for the three diagnoses that received a mean score of 2 or greater on a 0-4 scale were; pain distress, pain occurrence, sleep distress, vomiting occurrence, breathing distress. Profiles of symptoms for each diagnosis will be presented. Findings and Implications: Symptom ratings were higher than anticipated in this treatment naive population. Patients rated pain distress and pain occurrence as the most frequently occurring symptom regardless of diagnosis. Accurate assessment of baseline symptoms can facilitate oncology nurses in the management of symptoms thereby enhancing patient's ability to tolerate treatments and improve quality of life.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Orlando, Florida, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleProfile on Cancer Related Symptoms Prior to Chemotherapyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRowe, K.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSchneider, S.en_US
dc.contributor.authorEdwards-Hoods, Len_US
dc.author.detailsK. Rowe, Duke U. Health System Ed. Services, Durham, North Carolina, USA; S. Schneider; L. Edwards-Hoodsen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165359-
dc.description.abstractManagement of patient symptoms is an integral component of oncology nursing care. Patient reports of symptoms are essential for guiding both the diagnosis and treatment of all types of cancer. The majority of literature on cancer patient symptoms focuses on treatment related side effects. Very little attention has focused on baseline symptoms that patients present with prior to the initiation of treatment. Purpose: This study is to identify a profile of symptoms experienced by patients with breast, lung, and colon cancer experience before beginning a chemotherapy regimen. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: Symptom distress is defined as a general indicator of symptoms experienced by cancer patients (McCorkle &Young, 1978). Symptom distress or discomfort stemming from symptoms interferes with a person's ability to perform activities of daily living and affects quality of life (Grant, 1997; Macquart-Moulin, 1999; Pickett, 1991). Methods: Secondary analysis of baseline data from an intervention study to reduce chemotherapy-related symptom distress in 90 adults receiving chemotherapy for breast, colon, or lung cancer at Duke University Comprehensive Cancer Center. Participants completed The Adapted Symptom Distress Scale-2 immediately prior to receiving their first chemotherapy treatment. Patients had not received any prior chemotherapy or radiation treatments. The ASDS-2 has demonstrated reliability and validity in this population. Data Analysis: Descriptive Statistics and frequency analysis used to identify the most commonly reported symptoms. Baseline symptoms for the three diagnoses that received a mean score of 2 or greater on a 0-4 scale were; pain distress, pain occurrence, sleep distress, vomiting occurrence, breathing distress. Profiles of symptoms for each diagnosis will be presented. Findings and Implications: Symptom ratings were higher than anticipated in this treatment naive population. Patients rated pain distress and pain occurrence as the most frequently occurring symptom regardless of diagnosis. Accurate assessment of baseline symptoms can facilitate oncology nurses in the management of symptoms thereby enhancing patient's ability to tolerate treatments and improve quality of life.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:17:08Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:17:08Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationOrlando, Florida, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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