2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165360
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Approaching Death: A Phenomenological Study
Author(s):
Ryan, P.
Author Details:
P. Ryan, University of Kentucky, Department of Behavior Science, College of Medicine Office Building, Lexington, Kentucky, USA
Abstract:
An understanding of the end-of-life experience from the patient's perspective is limited. It is important that care be based on understanding; not merely healthcare professional's assumption or caregiver's retrospective reports. Purpose: Knowledge developed directly from the patient's perspective is needed in order to design meaningful care. The purpose of this study was to explore the lived experience of approaching death among elderly persons with advanced cancer. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: Methods: A qualitative design with a phenomenological approach was used with five purposively selected participants. Multiple in-depth interviews were conducted over time in the homes of the participants or in a private hospital room. A set of open-ended questions designed by the researcher were used as a general guide for the interviews. Data Analysis: Each taped interview was repeatedly reviewed following its completion. The tapes were transcribed by the researcher verbatim. The material was subjected to a process Munhall (2001) refers to as contextual processing. This activity occurs parallel to the inquiry. This process provides a departure from generating themes and categories and allows for the composition of a narrative that reflects one person's description of the experience within his or her situated context. Findings and Implications: Five insightful and compelling narratives of these individuals' experiences suggest that genuine caring, compassionate honesty from trusted healthcare professionals, cautious hopefulness maintained by the individual and their loved ones, unquestioned faith, an involvement in desired life activities, and positive interactions within the healthcare system and in their personal relationships were meaningful to this experience. As we look beyond the diagnosis and consider the lived experience, we get a more vivid picture of the whole person and the meaning the experience holds for them and those who love them. Knowledge of this experience allows healthcare professionals to honor the remaining "precious moments" of these individuals lives by respecting their humanity, preserving their dignity, ensuring their comfort, and advocating for the highest quality of palliative care. Such knowledge can enable healthcare professionals and others providing care to assist individuals approaching death and their families to do so in a way that is meaningful rather than merely tolerable.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Orlando, Florida, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleApproaching Death: A Phenomenological Studyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRyan, P.en_US
dc.author.detailsP. Ryan, University of Kentucky, Department of Behavior Science, College of Medicine Office Building, Lexington, Kentucky, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165360-
dc.description.abstractAn understanding of the end-of-life experience from the patient's perspective is limited. It is important that care be based on understanding; not merely healthcare professional's assumption or caregiver's retrospective reports. Purpose: Knowledge developed directly from the patient's perspective is needed in order to design meaningful care. The purpose of this study was to explore the lived experience of approaching death among elderly persons with advanced cancer. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: Methods: A qualitative design with a phenomenological approach was used with five purposively selected participants. Multiple in-depth interviews were conducted over time in the homes of the participants or in a private hospital room. A set of open-ended questions designed by the researcher were used as a general guide for the interviews. Data Analysis: Each taped interview was repeatedly reviewed following its completion. The tapes were transcribed by the researcher verbatim. The material was subjected to a process Munhall (2001) refers to as contextual processing. This activity occurs parallel to the inquiry. This process provides a departure from generating themes and categories and allows for the composition of a narrative that reflects one person's description of the experience within his or her situated context. Findings and Implications: Five insightful and compelling narratives of these individuals' experiences suggest that genuine caring, compassionate honesty from trusted healthcare professionals, cautious hopefulness maintained by the individual and their loved ones, unquestioned faith, an involvement in desired life activities, and positive interactions within the healthcare system and in their personal relationships were meaningful to this experience. As we look beyond the diagnosis and consider the lived experience, we get a more vivid picture of the whole person and the meaning the experience holds for them and those who love them. Knowledge of this experience allows healthcare professionals to honor the remaining "precious moments" of these individuals lives by respecting their humanity, preserving their dignity, ensuring their comfort, and advocating for the highest quality of palliative care. Such knowledge can enable healthcare professionals and others providing care to assist individuals approaching death and their families to do so in a way that is meaningful rather than merely tolerable.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:17:09Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:17:09Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationOrlando, Florida, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.