Exploring the Relationships Between Cancer Pain, Attitudinal Barriers, and PTSD: A Descriptive Study

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165363
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Exploring the Relationships Between Cancer Pain, Attitudinal Barriers, and PTSD: A Descriptive Study
Author(s):
Thomas, M.; Elliott, J.; Douglas, M.
Author Details:
M. Thomas, VA Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, California, USA; J. Elliott; M. Douglas
Abstract:
The impact of cancer and its treatment can evoke extreme distress, including the anxiety disorder Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). While awareness of PTSD in this population is increasing, its impact on cancer-related pain and pain management (PM) is not known. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of PTSD in the context of the cancer pain experience, and particularly, to explore the relationships between PTSD and patients’ attitudinal barriers (ABs) toward PM. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: PTSD was conceptualized as a complex anxiety disorder, involving three symptom clusters: intrusive re-experiencing, avoidance/numbing, and hyper-arousal. Cancer pain was conceptualized as multidimensional (Ahles), impacted by one’s ABs to PM. Methods: A convenience sample of 289 adults with pain related to cancer/treatment participated. Instruments with established reliability and validity were used to measure the following variables: Brief Pain Inventory (pain severity, pain relief, pain-related interference with function), Barriers Questionnaire (ABs), PTSD Check List-Civilian (PTSD), POMS (mood disturbance), and FACT-G (quality of life, QOL). Data Analysis: Results were analyzed using independent sample t-tests. Findings and Implications: The sample was predominately male (88%), veteran (85%), middle aged, with a variety of cancer types; over 30% were receiving concurrent cancer therapy. In this sample, 78 patients (27%) met the DSM criteria for PTSD, yet few had a documented diagnosis of PTSD. Symptoms related to hyper-vigilance and avoidance/numbing were more prominent than those related to re-experiencing. While there was no significant difference in pain severity between those meeting criteria for PTSD and those who did not, those who were positive for PTSD had significantly greater functional interference from pain, had less pain relief, and less satisfaction with PM. Those positive for PTSD had significantly higher ABs than those negative for PTSD, and demonstrated greater mood disturbance (tension and depression), and poorer QOL (physical, social, emotional well-being). These data depict a highly significant relationship between PTSD and ABs; additional analysis is on-going to further explore this important relationship. To effectively manage cancer pain, ABs must be addressed. Findings from this study suggest that issues related to PTSD are also important in this context, and warrant further investigation and clinical intervention.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Orlando, Florida, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleExploring the Relationships Between Cancer Pain, Attitudinal Barriers, and PTSD: A Descriptive Studyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorThomas, M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorElliott, J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDouglas, M.en_US
dc.author.detailsM. Thomas, VA Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, California, USA; J. Elliott; M. Douglasen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165363-
dc.description.abstractThe impact of cancer and its treatment can evoke extreme distress, including the anxiety disorder Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). While awareness of PTSD in this population is increasing, its impact on cancer-related pain and pain management (PM) is not known. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of PTSD in the context of the cancer pain experience, and particularly, to explore the relationships between PTSD and patients’ attitudinal barriers (ABs) toward PM. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: PTSD was conceptualized as a complex anxiety disorder, involving three symptom clusters: intrusive re-experiencing, avoidance/numbing, and hyper-arousal. Cancer pain was conceptualized as multidimensional (Ahles), impacted by one’s ABs to PM. Methods: A convenience sample of 289 adults with pain related to cancer/treatment participated. Instruments with established reliability and validity were used to measure the following variables: Brief Pain Inventory (pain severity, pain relief, pain-related interference with function), Barriers Questionnaire (ABs), PTSD Check List-Civilian (PTSD), POMS (mood disturbance), and FACT-G (quality of life, QOL). Data Analysis: Results were analyzed using independent sample t-tests. Findings and Implications: The sample was predominately male (88%), veteran (85%), middle aged, with a variety of cancer types; over 30% were receiving concurrent cancer therapy. In this sample, 78 patients (27%) met the DSM criteria for PTSD, yet few had a documented diagnosis of PTSD. Symptoms related to hyper-vigilance and avoidance/numbing were more prominent than those related to re-experiencing. While there was no significant difference in pain severity between those meeting criteria for PTSD and those who did not, those who were positive for PTSD had significantly greater functional interference from pain, had less pain relief, and less satisfaction with PM. Those positive for PTSD had significantly higher ABs than those negative for PTSD, and demonstrated greater mood disturbance (tension and depression), and poorer QOL (physical, social, emotional well-being). These data depict a highly significant relationship between PTSD and ABs; additional analysis is on-going to further explore this important relationship. To effectively manage cancer pain, ABs must be addressed. Findings from this study suggest that issues related to PTSD are also important in this context, and warrant further investigation and clinical intervention.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:17:12Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:17:12Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationOrlando, Florida, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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