Health Beliefs and Practices Related to breast Cancer Screening in Filipino, Chinese, and Asian Indian Women

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165364
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Health Beliefs and Practices Related to breast Cancer Screening in Filipino, Chinese, and Asian Indian Women
Author(s):
Wu, Ty; Chen, Y. W.; Hergert, C.
Author Details:
Ty Wu, Eastern Michigan University, Ypsilanti, Michigan, USA; Y. W. Chen; C. Hergert
Abstract:
Cultural-appropriate strategies can be designed to promote cancer screening if the unique needs and characteristics of ethnic groups are identified. Most of the data available for Asian immigrants living in the U.S. has been aggregated under the Asian American/Pacific Islanders (AAPI) ethnic category. Purpose: This paper reports examined cancer-related practices and beliefs among three subgroups (Filipino, Chinese, and Asian Indian) of Asian American women (N=125). Self-administered questionnaire assessed screening practices (i.e., breast self-exam, clinical breast exam, and mammography), related beliefs and knowledge. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: The current study used the Health Belief Model to guide our work to identify differences between three groups of Asian-American women (i.e., Chinese, Filipino, and Asian Indian) on perceived susceptibility, perceived seriousness, perceived benefits, and perceived barriers for engaging in breast cancer screening after controlling for income level. Methods: The current project used a cross-sectional, correlational design. Self-administered questionnaire that assessed women's screening practices (i.e., breast self-exam, clinical breast exam, and mammography), related beliefs and knowledge were developed and pilot tested in a previous study. The survey was either mailed to study participants or filled out by subjects at the locations where recruitment took place. The convenience sample consisted of 125 women whose age ranged from 31–78 years (mean = 50.2 years, s.d. = 11.1). Data Analysis: Data were coded and entered into the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 12.0. Data were analyzed using two-way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) and Logistic Regression were performed to test the hypotheses. Findings and Implications: The results showed the strong influence of ethnicity in perceptions of susceptibility and seriousness related to breast cancer and interaction effect on perceived barriers with ethnicity and income. The results also indicated that there were three common barriers were reported and three unique barriers were identified by Chinese and Asian Indian women. Results can be used to develop intervention targeted special characteristics for women of different Asian groups.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Orlando, Florida, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHealth Beliefs and Practices Related to breast Cancer Screening in Filipino, Chinese, and Asian Indian Womenen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWu, Tyen_US
dc.contributor.authorChen, Y. W.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHergert, C.en_US
dc.author.detailsTy Wu, Eastern Michigan University, Ypsilanti, Michigan, USA; Y. W. Chen; C. Hergerten_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165364-
dc.description.abstractCultural-appropriate strategies can be designed to promote cancer screening if the unique needs and characteristics of ethnic groups are identified. Most of the data available for Asian immigrants living in the U.S. has been aggregated under the Asian American/Pacific Islanders (AAPI) ethnic category. Purpose: This paper reports examined cancer-related practices and beliefs among three subgroups (Filipino, Chinese, and Asian Indian) of Asian American women (N=125). Self-administered questionnaire assessed screening practices (i.e., breast self-exam, clinical breast exam, and mammography), related beliefs and knowledge. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: The current study used the Health Belief Model to guide our work to identify differences between three groups of Asian-American women (i.e., Chinese, Filipino, and Asian Indian) on perceived susceptibility, perceived seriousness, perceived benefits, and perceived barriers for engaging in breast cancer screening after controlling for income level. Methods: The current project used a cross-sectional, correlational design. Self-administered questionnaire that assessed women's screening practices (i.e., breast self-exam, clinical breast exam, and mammography), related beliefs and knowledge were developed and pilot tested in a previous study. The survey was either mailed to study participants or filled out by subjects at the locations where recruitment took place. The convenience sample consisted of 125 women whose age ranged from 31–78 years (mean = 50.2 years, s.d. = 11.1). Data Analysis: Data were coded and entered into the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 12.0. Data were analyzed using two-way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) and Logistic Regression were performed to test the hypotheses. Findings and Implications: The results showed the strong influence of ethnicity in perceptions of susceptibility and seriousness related to breast cancer and interaction effect on perceived barriers with ethnicity and income. The results also indicated that there were three common barriers were reported and three unique barriers were identified by Chinese and Asian Indian women. Results can be used to develop intervention targeted special characteristics for women of different Asian groups.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:17:13Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:17:13Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationOrlando, Florida, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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