PERCEIVED BARRIERS TO BREAST CANCER SCREENING: A COMPARISON OF AFRICAN AMERICAN AND CAUCASIAN WOMEN

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165367
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
PERCEIVED BARRIERS TO BREAST CANCER SCREENING: A COMPARISON OF AFRICAN AMERICAN AND CAUCASIAN WOMEN
Author(s):
Bastien, Natalie
Author Details:
Natalie Bastien, ARNP, MS, Administrative Coordinator, Moffitt Cancer and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida, USA, email: bastiensdc4@aol.com
Abstract:
Topic: Although the incidence of breast cancer is high among Caucasian women, African American women continue to experience higher breast cancer mortality and lower survival rates in comparison to Caucasian women of the same age and cancer stage. Research regarding breast cancer screening among ethnic minority women from lower socioeconomic groups is extensive, but there is a lack of research that investigates barriers to breast cancer screening among African American women of higher socioeconomic status. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare health beliefs of African American and Caucasian women regarding perceived barriers to breast cancer screening. Framework: The study was conducted at two local community churches located in Tampa, Florida. The barriers subscale from the Health Belief scale was used for data collection. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze demographic data, and independent t-tests were used to compare the two groups in their perceived barriers. Methods: Results revealed that both groups perceived barriers to breast cancer screening, there were more similarities than differences. However, African American women were significantly more likely to indicate that having a mammogram would make them worry about breast cancer (p = 0.39). Findings: Although previous research has shown differences between African American and Caucasian women, this study did not support those results. The two groups of women were similar in age education and marital status and all were active in their churches. Perhaps these similarities led to the lack of differences in perceived barriers scores between the two groups. This finding lends support to the idea that socioeconomic status more than race leads to disparities in breast cancer screening.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
31st Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Boston, Massachusetts, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePERCEIVED BARRIERS TO BREAST CANCER SCREENING: A COMPARISON OF AFRICAN AMERICAN AND CAUCASIAN WOMENen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBastien, Natalieen_US
dc.author.detailsNatalie Bastien, ARNP, MS, Administrative Coordinator, Moffitt Cancer and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida, USA, email: bastiensdc4@aol.comen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165367-
dc.description.abstractTopic: Although the incidence of breast cancer is high among Caucasian women, African American women continue to experience higher breast cancer mortality and lower survival rates in comparison to Caucasian women of the same age and cancer stage. Research regarding breast cancer screening among ethnic minority women from lower socioeconomic groups is extensive, but there is a lack of research that investigates barriers to breast cancer screening among African American women of higher socioeconomic status. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare health beliefs of African American and Caucasian women regarding perceived barriers to breast cancer screening. Framework: The study was conducted at two local community churches located in Tampa, Florida. The barriers subscale from the Health Belief scale was used for data collection. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze demographic data, and independent t-tests were used to compare the two groups in their perceived barriers. Methods: Results revealed that both groups perceived barriers to breast cancer screening, there were more similarities than differences. However, African American women were significantly more likely to indicate that having a mammogram would make them worry about breast cancer (p = 0.39). Findings: Although previous research has shown differences between African American and Caucasian women, this study did not support those results. The two groups of women were similar in age education and marital status and all were active in their churches. Perhaps these similarities led to the lack of differences in perceived barriers scores between the two groups. This finding lends support to the idea that socioeconomic status more than race leads to disparities in breast cancer screening.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:17:16Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:17:16Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name31st Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationBoston, Massachusetts, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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