SELF-CARE AND COPING ACTIVITIES OF METASTATIC BREAST CANCER PATIENTS: DESCRIPTION AND FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH USE

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165368
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
SELF-CARE AND COPING ACTIVITIES OF METASTATIC BREAST CANCER PATIENTS: DESCRIPTION AND FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH USE
Author(s):
Bauer-Wu, Susan; Norris, Rebecca; Liu, Qin
Author Details:
Susan Bauer-Wu, DNSc, RN, Director, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, USA, email: sbauerwu@partners.org; Rebecca Norris and Qin Liu
Abstract:
Topic: Living with metastatic breast cancer can be physically and emotionally challenging. How individuals cope with the experience can be quite variable. Considerable research has described coping and self-care activities in early stage breast cancer patients, however little is known about this issue for women with advanced stages. Purpose: To describe coping and self-care activities used by women with metastatic breast cancer and to examine relationships between participation in these activities, demographics characteristics, and cancer coping style. Framework: City of Hope's Quality of Life framework and Watson and Greer's principles on cancer coping styles guided this work. Advanced-stage breast cancer patients (N=173) from five cancer treatment facilities across New England completed questionnaires at one time point, assessing cancer coping style (Mini Mental Adjustment to Cancer), demographic characteristics, and different self-care and coping activities. Descriptive and logistic regression analyses were conducted for this secondary analysis, using baseline data from a longitudinal intervention study. Findings: This sample of women with advanced breast cancer commonly used self-care activities, and coping style influenced their participation in some of these activities. A high percentage of participants participated in aerobic exercise at least 2-3 times per week (57%), used prayer/spiritual practices on a regular basis (73%), participated in a cancer support group (45%), and confided in someone when feeling upset (96%), especially significant other. Additionally 26% were keeping a journal. Younger patients (p=0.003), with higher levels of education (p=0.009), and a fatalistic coping style (p=0.02) were more likely to practice yoga/meditation. Use of prayer or other spiritual practices was associated with a fatalistic coping style (p<0.0001), and negatively associated with helplessness/hopelessness (p=0.046) and cognitive avoidance (p=0.004) coping style. Patients who kept a journal were more likely to have a lower performance status (p=0.042) and have a helplessness/hopelessness (p=0.009) coping style. Oncology nurses and other healthcare professionals can be sensitive to their patients' coping styles and provide guidance accordingly on self-care and coping activities that may be most helpful.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
31st Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Boston, Massachusetts, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSELF-CARE AND COPING ACTIVITIES OF METASTATIC BREAST CANCER PATIENTS: DESCRIPTION AND FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH USEen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBauer-Wu, Susanen_US
dc.contributor.authorNorris, Rebeccaen_US
dc.contributor.authorLiu, Qinen_US
dc.author.detailsSusan Bauer-Wu, DNSc, RN, Director, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, USA, email: sbauerwu@partners.org; Rebecca Norris and Qin Liuen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165368-
dc.description.abstractTopic: Living with metastatic breast cancer can be physically and emotionally challenging. How individuals cope with the experience can be quite variable. Considerable research has described coping and self-care activities in early stage breast cancer patients, however little is known about this issue for women with advanced stages. Purpose: To describe coping and self-care activities used by women with metastatic breast cancer and to examine relationships between participation in these activities, demographics characteristics, and cancer coping style. Framework: City of Hope's Quality of Life framework and Watson and Greer's principles on cancer coping styles guided this work. Advanced-stage breast cancer patients (N=173) from five cancer treatment facilities across New England completed questionnaires at one time point, assessing cancer coping style (Mini Mental Adjustment to Cancer), demographic characteristics, and different self-care and coping activities. Descriptive and logistic regression analyses were conducted for this secondary analysis, using baseline data from a longitudinal intervention study. Findings: This sample of women with advanced breast cancer commonly used self-care activities, and coping style influenced their participation in some of these activities. A high percentage of participants participated in aerobic exercise at least 2-3 times per week (57%), used prayer/spiritual practices on a regular basis (73%), participated in a cancer support group (45%), and confided in someone when feeling upset (96%), especially significant other. Additionally 26% were keeping a journal. Younger patients (p=0.003), with higher levels of education (p=0.009), and a fatalistic coping style (p=0.02) were more likely to practice yoga/meditation. Use of prayer or other spiritual practices was associated with a fatalistic coping style (p&lt;0.0001), and negatively associated with helplessness/hopelessness (p=0.046) and cognitive avoidance (p=0.004) coping style. Patients who kept a journal were more likely to have a lower performance status (p=0.042) and have a helplessness/hopelessness (p=0.009) coping style. Oncology nurses and other healthcare professionals can be sensitive to their patients' coping styles and provide guidance accordingly on self-care and coping activities that may be most helpful.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:17:17Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:17:17Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name31st Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationBoston, Massachusetts, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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