ONCOLOGY NURSES ATTITUDES AND PRACTICES ABOUT INFORMING CLINICAL TRIALS PARTICIPANTS OF STUDY RESULTS

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165369
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
ONCOLOGY NURSES ATTITUDES AND PRACTICES ABOUT INFORMING CLINICAL TRIALS PARTICIPANTS OF STUDY RESULTS
Author(s):
Bauer-Wu, Susan; Fulton, Monica; Winer, Eric; Partridge, Ann
Author Details:
Susan Bauer-Wu, DNSc, RN, Director, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, USA, email: sbauerwu@partners.org; Monica Fulton, Eric Winer, and Ann Partridge
Abstract:
Topic: Growing evidence supports that cancer patients are interested in being offered the results of clinical trials for which they participate. However there is no standardization or requirements for clinicians or researchers to offer such information to patients. Better understanding oncology nurses' perspectives on this issue is important to the development and integration of formalized systems to share clinical trial results with patients. Purpose: To examine the attitudes and practices of oncology nurses with regard to informing clinical trial participants study results. Framework: This study was guided by key principles of research ethics: respect for persons, beneficence, and justice. Methods: A geographically dispersed sample of 125 oncology nurses who are members of the cancer cooperative group, Cancer and Leukemia Group B, completed and returned a mailed 31-item questionnaire designed and piloted for this study. Descriptive statistics were conducted. Findings: 62% of the nurses sampled do not offer results to patients and only 10.4% offer over half of the time. 73% agreed that most patients want to know study results and 83% agreed that patients should be offered this information. Benefits of routinely offering results to patients include: courtesy to patients, improve patient understanding of trials, improve patient satisfaction with care, and increase accrual to trials. Concerns about offering results to patients include: patients might not understand, entail too much money and time; patients can't act on this knowledge, negative emotional effects on clinicians and patients. 78% indicated willingness to offer results to patients, with 30% indicating they were less willing to do it for phase I/II compared with phase III studies. 9% would be less likely to enroll patients on trials if providing results was obligated, while 33% believe a policy obligating is a bad idea. Oncology nurses play an essential role in educating and counseling patients regarding clinical trials participation. Nurses need to be aware of their own attitudes and consider the implications if policies are put into place. If mandated, resources will be needed to account for the additional time required to appropriately provide this information to patients.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
31st Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Boston, Massachusetts, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleONCOLOGY NURSES ATTITUDES AND PRACTICES ABOUT INFORMING CLINICAL TRIALS PARTICIPANTS OF STUDY RESULTSen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBauer-Wu, Susanen_US
dc.contributor.authorFulton, Monicaen_US
dc.contributor.authorWiner, Ericen_US
dc.contributor.authorPartridge, Annen_US
dc.author.detailsSusan Bauer-Wu, DNSc, RN, Director, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, USA, email: sbauerwu@partners.org; Monica Fulton, Eric Winer, and Ann Partridgeen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165369-
dc.description.abstractTopic: Growing evidence supports that cancer patients are interested in being offered the results of clinical trials for which they participate. However there is no standardization or requirements for clinicians or researchers to offer such information to patients. Better understanding oncology nurses' perspectives on this issue is important to the development and integration of formalized systems to share clinical trial results with patients. Purpose: To examine the attitudes and practices of oncology nurses with regard to informing clinical trial participants study results. Framework: This study was guided by key principles of research ethics: respect for persons, beneficence, and justice. Methods: A geographically dispersed sample of 125 oncology nurses who are members of the cancer cooperative group, Cancer and Leukemia Group B, completed and returned a mailed 31-item questionnaire designed and piloted for this study. Descriptive statistics were conducted. Findings: 62% of the nurses sampled do not offer results to patients and only 10.4% offer over half of the time. 73% agreed that most patients want to know study results and 83% agreed that patients should be offered this information. Benefits of routinely offering results to patients include: courtesy to patients, improve patient understanding of trials, improve patient satisfaction with care, and increase accrual to trials. Concerns about offering results to patients include: patients might not understand, entail too much money and time; patients can't act on this knowledge, negative emotional effects on clinicians and patients. 78% indicated willingness to offer results to patients, with 30% indicating they were less willing to do it for phase I/II compared with phase III studies. 9% would be less likely to enroll patients on trials if providing results was obligated, while 33% believe a policy obligating is a bad idea. Oncology nurses play an essential role in educating and counseling patients regarding clinical trials participation. Nurses need to be aware of their own attitudes and consider the implications if policies are put into place. If mandated, resources will be needed to account for the additional time required to appropriately provide this information to patients.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:17:18Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:17:18Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name31st Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationBoston, Massachusetts, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.