WHAT IS THE LIVED EXPERIENCE FOR CAREGIVERS 6-18 MONTHS POST ALLOGENEIC TRANSPLANTATION?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165372
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
WHAT IS THE LIVED EXPERIENCE FOR CAREGIVERS 6-18 MONTHS POST ALLOGENEIC TRANSPLANTATION?
Author(s):
Brown, Frank
Author Details:
Frank Brown, RN, BSN, OCN, MS, Nurse Administrator, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York, USA, email: frank.brown@roswellpark.org
Abstract:
Topic: Each year, over 100,000 individuals face unexpected Hematological malignancies with the high potential of life threatening consequences. In many cases, stem cell transplantation is the only curative chance for survival. Stem cell transplantation is a challenging prospect, not only for the patient, but also for the family/significant other caregivers that will be a part of this journey. Caregivers play a key role from the moment the treatment plan is begun, to follow-up after transplant and potentially many years beyond during survivorship. Since there are a limited number of research studies focusing on caregivers' experiences with stem cell transplantation, this phenomenological, qualitative research study examined the lived experience of caregivers 6-18 months post allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore the lived experience of caregivers for patients 6-18 months post allogeneic stem cell transplantation. The findings of the study will be utilized to develop strategies to meet the needs of these caregivers and to help them to successfully carry out the various responsibilities they face in the crucial role they play in the patient's care following allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Framework: The theoretical framework that was used for this study is the theory of Human Caring (1999) by Dr. Jean Watson. Methods: Purposeful sampling was utilized to recruit six caregivers who voluntarily consented to participate in the study. Data were collected via semi-structured, audiotaped interviews, which were then transcribed verbatim. Colaizzi's method was utilized throughout data collection and analysis to identify themes that depicted the essence of the lived experience of caregivers. Findings: The data clearly demonstrated that the caregiving experience had a significant impact on the lives of these caregivers. Six preliminary themes emerged during the initial data analysis: " Life changes in an instant"; "Obligation to become the caregiver"; "Managing worries and uncertainties"; " Responsibilities to keep the recipient alive"; "Multifaceted role"; and Feeling good about being able to help."e.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
31st Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Boston, Massachusetts, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWHAT IS THE LIVED EXPERIENCE FOR CAREGIVERS 6-18 MONTHS POST ALLOGENEIC TRANSPLANTATION?en_GB
dc.contributor.authorBrown, Franken_US
dc.author.detailsFrank Brown, RN, BSN, OCN, MS, Nurse Administrator, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York, USA, email: frank.brown@roswellpark.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165372-
dc.description.abstractTopic: Each year, over 100,000 individuals face unexpected Hematological malignancies with the high potential of life threatening consequences. In many cases, stem cell transplantation is the only curative chance for survival. Stem cell transplantation is a challenging prospect, not only for the patient, but also for the family/significant other caregivers that will be a part of this journey. Caregivers play a key role from the moment the treatment plan is begun, to follow-up after transplant and potentially many years beyond during survivorship. Since there are a limited number of research studies focusing on caregivers' experiences with stem cell transplantation, this phenomenological, qualitative research study examined the lived experience of caregivers 6-18 months post allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore the lived experience of caregivers for patients 6-18 months post allogeneic stem cell transplantation. The findings of the study will be utilized to develop strategies to meet the needs of these caregivers and to help them to successfully carry out the various responsibilities they face in the crucial role they play in the patient's care following allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Framework: The theoretical framework that was used for this study is the theory of Human Caring (1999) by Dr. Jean Watson. Methods: Purposeful sampling was utilized to recruit six caregivers who voluntarily consented to participate in the study. Data were collected via semi-structured, audiotaped interviews, which were then transcribed verbatim. Colaizzi's method was utilized throughout data collection and analysis to identify themes that depicted the essence of the lived experience of caregivers. Findings: The data clearly demonstrated that the caregiving experience had a significant impact on the lives of these caregivers. Six preliminary themes emerged during the initial data analysis: " Life changes in an instant"; "Obligation to become the caregiver"; "Managing worries and uncertainties"; " Responsibilities to keep the recipient alive"; "Multifaceted role"; and Feeling good about being able to help.&quote.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:17:22Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:17:22Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name31st Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationBoston, Massachusetts, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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