SEATTLE CANCER CARE ALLIANCE (SCCA) DISCHARGE MEDICATION STUDY: AN EVIDENCE-BASED PROJECT

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165377
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
SEATTLE CANCER CARE ALLIANCE (SCCA) DISCHARGE MEDICATION STUDY: AN EVIDENCE-BASED PROJECT
Author(s):
Cunningham, Terri; Wickline, Mihkai; Fryzlewicz, Bonnie; Donna, Berry; Sue Berg Bonham, Carolina
Author Details:
Terri Cunningham, RN, MSN, AOCN, Oncology CNS, Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, Seattle, Washington, USA, email: tcunning@seattlecca.org; Mihkai Wickline, Bonnie Fryzlewicz, Berry Donna, and Carolina Sue Berg Bonham
Abstract:
Topic: Complex healthcare systems are replete with opportunities for miscommunication, particularly with vulnerable patients who are compromised physically and emotionally during cancer therapy. Transition from the hospital to ambulatory care is a time in which accurate understandings are key for successful self-care, notably self-administration of medications. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine oncology and HSCT patients'/caregivers' understanding of discharge medication regimens following a hospital stay and to determine if the outpatient receiving nurse was aware of discharge medications. Two priorities in the 2005 ONS Research Agenda are directly relevant to this study: 1) research in nursing-sensitive patient outcomes and 2) translational research. Framework: The Quality Health Outcomes Model guided our approach to this study. This model illustrates how aspects of the healthcare system mediate patient outcomes. Methods: SCCA patients/caregivers who received chemotherapy as inpatients were offered participation as well as the ambulatory care nurses. Patients/caregivers were interviewed after discharge, inquiring as to knowledge (drug name, dose, frequency and purpose) and use of discharge medications. Then, the receiving ambulatory care nurse was interviewed. Percents of accurate medication knowledge and use and percents of receiving nurses' knowledge of discharge medications were calculated. Findings: Fifty-three adults and 19 children were enrolled (40 general oncology and 32 HSCT patients) in the study. This abstract includes data from the adult patients and their receiving nurses. Of the 53 adults, 36 were interviewed post-discharge revealing multiple discrepancies between the prescribed discharge medications and what the patient was able to report about their discharge medications and that the written nursing discharge instructions often differed from the discharge prescriptions. In addition, there were differences in the receiving nurses' knowledge (N=34) about discharge medication depending on the service setting, HSCT nurses were aware of the medications in 20/22 patients, whereas nurses receiving general oncology patients were aware in 4/12 cases. Clearly, improvements are indicated in our patient education approach and system wide communication. Using these data as baseline, the research team will evaluate the findings and suggest mechanisms, processes or tools that will improve patient discharge medication understanding and communication with outpatient receiving nurses.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
31st Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Boston, Massachusetts, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSEATTLE CANCER CARE ALLIANCE (SCCA) DISCHARGE MEDICATION STUDY: AN EVIDENCE-BASED PROJECTen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCunningham, Terrien_US
dc.contributor.authorWickline, Mihkaien_US
dc.contributor.authorFryzlewicz, Bonnieen_US
dc.contributor.authorDonna, Berryen_US
dc.contributor.authorSue Berg Bonham, Carolinaen_US
dc.author.detailsTerri Cunningham, RN, MSN, AOCN, Oncology CNS, Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, Seattle, Washington, USA, email: tcunning@seattlecca.org; Mihkai Wickline, Bonnie Fryzlewicz, Berry Donna, and Carolina Sue Berg Bonhamen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165377-
dc.description.abstractTopic: Complex healthcare systems are replete with opportunities for miscommunication, particularly with vulnerable patients who are compromised physically and emotionally during cancer therapy. Transition from the hospital to ambulatory care is a time in which accurate understandings are key for successful self-care, notably self-administration of medications. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine oncology and HSCT patients'/caregivers' understanding of discharge medication regimens following a hospital stay and to determine if the outpatient receiving nurse was aware of discharge medications. Two priorities in the 2005 ONS Research Agenda are directly relevant to this study: 1) research in nursing-sensitive patient outcomes and 2) translational research. Framework: The Quality Health Outcomes Model guided our approach to this study. This model illustrates how aspects of the healthcare system mediate patient outcomes. Methods: SCCA patients/caregivers who received chemotherapy as inpatients were offered participation as well as the ambulatory care nurses. Patients/caregivers were interviewed after discharge, inquiring as to knowledge (drug name, dose, frequency and purpose) and use of discharge medications. Then, the receiving ambulatory care nurse was interviewed. Percents of accurate medication knowledge and use and percents of receiving nurses' knowledge of discharge medications were calculated. Findings: Fifty-three adults and 19 children were enrolled (40 general oncology and 32 HSCT patients) in the study. This abstract includes data from the adult patients and their receiving nurses. Of the 53 adults, 36 were interviewed post-discharge revealing multiple discrepancies between the prescribed discharge medications and what the patient was able to report about their discharge medications and that the written nursing discharge instructions often differed from the discharge prescriptions. In addition, there were differences in the receiving nurses' knowledge (N=34) about discharge medication depending on the service setting, HSCT nurses were aware of the medications in 20/22 patients, whereas nurses receiving general oncology patients were aware in 4/12 cases. Clearly, improvements are indicated in our patient education approach and system wide communication. Using these data as baseline, the research team will evaluate the findings and suggest mechanisms, processes or tools that will improve patient discharge medication understanding and communication with outpatient receiving nurses.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:17:27Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:17:27Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name31st Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationBoston, Massachusetts, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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