2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165381
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
SYMPTOM CLUSTER GROUPINGS MEMBERSHIP CHANGES OVER ONE YEAR
Author(s):
Dodd, Marylin; Cho, Maria; Cooper, Bruce; Miaskowski, Christine; Lee, Kathryn A.; Bank, Kayee A.
Author Details:
Marylin Dodd, RN, PhD, FAAN, Professor, School of Nursing, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California, USA, email: marylin.dodd@nursing.ucsf.edu; Maria Cho, Bruce Cooper, Christine Miaskowski, Kathryn A. Lee, and Kayee A. Bank
Abstract:
Topic: Symptom clusters is a new frontier in symptom management research. There are an increasing number of published articles, but NO studies that have reported the changes in symptom cluster patient group membership over time. The present study will fill this void. Purpose: Research Questions: 1. Can groups of oncology outpatients be identified based on how their symptoms cluster (i.e., pain, fatigue, sleep disturbances, and depressive mood)? 2. Do patients in different symptom cluster groupings differ in outcomes (i.e., functional status and quality of life)? 3. Do symptom cluster group memberships change overtime during and after cancer treatment? Framework: Symptom Management Model (Dodd, et al. 2001). Methods: 92 women with breast cancer, mean age of 50 years, completed several established instruments (i.e., Brief Pain Inventory, Piper's Fatigue Scale, General Sleep Disturbance Scale, CES-Depression, Karnofsky's Performance Status, and MQOL-CA2) three times in an ongoing randomized clinical trial. T1= baseline after the first cycle of CTX, T2= after completion of cancer treatment, T3= end of the study, 6 months after T2. Cluster analysis is a statistical technique used to cluster similar patients in subgroups based on their symptom experience. Findings: Four symptom cluster groups were identified at T1, T2 & T3. The groupings were: Low on all symptom scores; High on all symptom scores; and two remaining cluster subgroups were a mix of high/moderate and low symptom scores with the severity of pain being the distinguishing feature between these two groupings. The all Low symptom subgroup had significantly higher performance status and quality of life scores than the other 3 subgroups. Changes in cluster group membership clearly showed a shift from lower symptom severity to higher levels from T1 to T2; and a shift from higher levels to lower levels of severity during the recovery period from T2 to T3. This presentation is the first to report changes in symptom clusters overtime and furthers our understanding of the course of the symptom experience, with implications for the impact of symptom clusters and the timing of interventions.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
31st Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Boston, Massachusetts, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSYMPTOM CLUSTER GROUPINGS MEMBERSHIP CHANGES OVER ONE YEARen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDodd, Marylinen_US
dc.contributor.authorCho, Mariaen_US
dc.contributor.authorCooper, Bruceen_US
dc.contributor.authorMiaskowski, Christineen_US
dc.contributor.authorLee, Kathryn A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBank, Kayee A.en_US
dc.author.detailsMarylin Dodd, RN, PhD, FAAN, Professor, School of Nursing, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California, USA, email: marylin.dodd@nursing.ucsf.edu; Maria Cho, Bruce Cooper, Christine Miaskowski, Kathryn A. Lee, and Kayee A. Banken_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165381-
dc.description.abstractTopic: Symptom clusters is a new frontier in symptom management research. There are an increasing number of published articles, but NO studies that have reported the changes in symptom cluster patient group membership over time. The present study will fill this void. Purpose: Research Questions: 1. Can groups of oncology outpatients be identified based on how their symptoms cluster (i.e., pain, fatigue, sleep disturbances, and depressive mood)? 2. Do patients in different symptom cluster groupings differ in outcomes (i.e., functional status and quality of life)? 3. Do symptom cluster group memberships change overtime during and after cancer treatment? Framework: Symptom Management Model (Dodd, et al. 2001). Methods: 92 women with breast cancer, mean age of 50 years, completed several established instruments (i.e., Brief Pain Inventory, Piper's Fatigue Scale, General Sleep Disturbance Scale, CES-Depression, Karnofsky's Performance Status, and MQOL-CA2) three times in an ongoing randomized clinical trial. T1= baseline after the first cycle of CTX, T2= after completion of cancer treatment, T3= end of the study, 6 months after T2. Cluster analysis is a statistical technique used to cluster similar patients in subgroups based on their symptom experience. Findings: Four symptom cluster groups were identified at T1, T2 & T3. The groupings were: Low on all symptom scores; High on all symptom scores; and two remaining cluster subgroups were a mix of high/moderate and low symptom scores with the severity of pain being the distinguishing feature between these two groupings. The all Low symptom subgroup had significantly higher performance status and quality of life scores than the other 3 subgroups. Changes in cluster group membership clearly showed a shift from lower symptom severity to higher levels from T1 to T2; and a shift from higher levels to lower levels of severity during the recovery period from T2 to T3. This presentation is the first to report changes in symptom clusters overtime and furthers our understanding of the course of the symptom experience, with implications for the impact of symptom clusters and the timing of interventions.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:17:31Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:17:31Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name31st Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationBoston, Massachusetts, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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