CULTURAL BELIEFS CONTRIBUTING TO LATE-STAGE DIAGNOSIS OF BREAST CANCER IN AFRICAN-AMERICAN, LATINA, AND CAUCASIAN WOMEN

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165383
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
CULTURAL BELIEFS CONTRIBUTING TO LATE-STAGE DIAGNOSIS OF BREAST CANCER IN AFRICAN-AMERICAN, LATINA, AND CAUCASIAN WOMEN
Author(s):
Ferrans, Carol; Akpan, Barbara; Davis, Margaret; Giachello, Aida; Johnson, Timothy; Martinez, Virginia; Parsons, Jennifer; Ramirez, Dinah; Ramos-Hernandez, Catalina; Warnecke, Richard; Willis, Marilyn
Author Details:
Carol Ferrans, PhD, RN, FAAN, Professor, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, USA, email: cferrans@uic.edu; Barbara Akpan, Margaret Davis, Aida Giachello, Timothy Johnson, Virginia Martinez, Jennifer Parsons, Dinah Ramirez, Catalina Ramos-Hernandez, Richard Warnecke, and Marilyn Willis Eileen Hacker, Karen Masino, Lisa Dobogai, and Marcia Mickle
Abstract:
Topic: Both Hispanic and African American women have higher odds ratios for diagnosis with later-stage breast cancer than Caucasian women. Women commonly delay in seeking medical care for three or more months after self-discovery of a breast symptom, and cultural factors play an important role. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify cultural beliefs contributing to the diagnosis of late-stage breast cancer in African-American and Latina women. Framework: An inductive approach was used to identify cultural beliefs, using Strauss and Corbin's (1990) coding techniques. Methods: First, cultural beliefs were identified, using a community participatory model to conduct four focus groups with Latinas (in Spanish and in English), African-American, and Caucasian women. Second, interviews with 117 women demonstrated that these beliefs were commonly held. Findings: Cultural beliefs contributing to non-participation in mammography and delay in seeking medical evaluation after finding a breast symptom were identified. Four categories of cultural beliefs were identified (and compared) among the three ethnic groups: (1) incorrect ideas about breast lumps; (2) use of self-help techniques; (3) faith-based beliefs; (4) futility of treatment. Differences in sources of health information also were identified among the groups, with the African-American and Latina women depending to a greater extent on social networks, rather than health care professionals and text-based media. Another difference was the use of stories to convey information, which was more prevalent in the African-American and Latina groups. In the stories, the strongest beliefs were based on experiences of people they knew personally. In addition, it was found that the health care system serving these women is ill equipped to handle increased demand. Findings from each group will be incorporated into community-based interventions to promote early detection of breast cancer, both by addressing cultural beliefs and by advocating for increased capacity for diagnostic and screening mammography. The use of a community participatory model resulted in richer data with greater cultural saliency, through the active collaboration of community partners in all phases of the study.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
31st Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Boston, Massachusetts, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCULTURAL BELIEFS CONTRIBUTING TO LATE-STAGE DIAGNOSIS OF BREAST CANCER IN AFRICAN-AMERICAN, LATINA, AND CAUCASIAN WOMENen_GB
dc.contributor.authorFerrans, Carolen_US
dc.contributor.authorAkpan, Barbaraen_US
dc.contributor.authorDavis, Margareten_US
dc.contributor.authorGiachello, Aidaen_US
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Timothyen_US
dc.contributor.authorMartinez, Virginiaen_US
dc.contributor.authorParsons, Jenniferen_US
dc.contributor.authorRamirez, Dinahen_US
dc.contributor.authorRamos-Hernandez, Catalinaen_US
dc.contributor.authorWarnecke, Richarden_US
dc.contributor.authorWillis, Marilynen_US
dc.author.detailsCarol Ferrans, PhD, RN, FAAN, Professor, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, USA, email: cferrans@uic.edu; Barbara Akpan, Margaret Davis, Aida Giachello, Timothy Johnson, Virginia Martinez, Jennifer Parsons, Dinah Ramirez, Catalina Ramos-Hernandez, Richard Warnecke, and Marilyn Willis Eileen Hacker, Karen Masino, Lisa Dobogai, and Marcia Mickleen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165383-
dc.description.abstractTopic: Both Hispanic and African American women have higher odds ratios for diagnosis with later-stage breast cancer than Caucasian women. Women commonly delay in seeking medical care for three or more months after self-discovery of a breast symptom, and cultural factors play an important role. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify cultural beliefs contributing to the diagnosis of late-stage breast cancer in African-American and Latina women. Framework: An inductive approach was used to identify cultural beliefs, using Strauss and Corbin's (1990) coding techniques. Methods: First, cultural beliefs were identified, using a community participatory model to conduct four focus groups with Latinas (in Spanish and in English), African-American, and Caucasian women. Second, interviews with 117 women demonstrated that these beliefs were commonly held. Findings: Cultural beliefs contributing to non-participation in mammography and delay in seeking medical evaluation after finding a breast symptom were identified. Four categories of cultural beliefs were identified (and compared) among the three ethnic groups: (1) incorrect ideas about breast lumps; (2) use of self-help techniques; (3) faith-based beliefs; (4) futility of treatment. Differences in sources of health information also were identified among the groups, with the African-American and Latina women depending to a greater extent on social networks, rather than health care professionals and text-based media. Another difference was the use of stories to convey information, which was more prevalent in the African-American and Latina groups. In the stories, the strongest beliefs were based on experiences of people they knew personally. In addition, it was found that the health care system serving these women is ill equipped to handle increased demand. Findings from each group will be incorporated into community-based interventions to promote early detection of breast cancer, both by addressing cultural beliefs and by advocating for increased capacity for diagnostic and screening mammography. The use of a community participatory model resulted in richer data with greater cultural saliency, through the active collaboration of community partners in all phases of the study.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:17:33Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:17:33Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name31st Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationBoston, Massachusetts, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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