A STUDY ON THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN FATIGUE, PAIN, INSOMNIA, AND GENDER IN PERSONS WITH LUNG CANCER

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165388
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A STUDY ON THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN FATIGUE, PAIN, INSOMNIA, AND GENDER IN PERSONS WITH LUNG CANCER
Author(s):
Hoffman, Amy; Given, Barbara A.; Von Eye, Alexander; Given, Charles W.; Gift, Audrey G.
Author Details:
Amy Hoffman, MSN, RN, Cancer Research Pre-Doctoral Fellowship, Michigan State University, Lansing, Michigan, USA, email: ahoffman32@aol.com; Barbara A. Given, Amy Hoffman, Alexander Von Eye, Charles W. Given, and Audrey G. Gift
Abstract:
Topic: Lung cancer is a disease with serious concurrent symptoms, such as fatigue, pain, and insomnia for both men and women. Investigating symptoms that may cluster together in specific cancer populations is important and is relatively new to nursing. Likewise, the study of gender differences to improve nursing-sensitive patient outcomes such as symptom status has become prominent. Targeting interventions towards symptom clusters and gender differences may identify those with lung cancer who could benefit from tailored symptom management protocol. Purpose: For recently diagnosed persons with lung cancer, this study examined the relationship between fatigue, pain, insomnia, and gender, while controlling for age, co-morbidities, and stage of cancer. Framework: The Theory of Unpleasant Symptoms (TOUS) was used to guide this study. The TOUS conceptualizes symptoms as occurring together and identifies categories of antecedents to the symptoms. Methods: Secondary data analysis from baseline observation of a randomized clinical intervention trial was performed on 80 persons with lung cancer using only their pre-chemotherapy information. Multinomial log-linear modeling was performed to identify the most parsimonious model from the saturated model to explain the relationships between fatigue, pain, insomnia, and gender. Findings: Among patients with lung cancer, fatigue (94%) and pain (67%) were the most frequently occurring symptoms with insomnia occurring 50% of the time. A model containing all main effects; 2-way interactions of fatigue and pain, pain and insomnia, and insomnia and gender; and the 3-way interaction of fatigue, pain, and insomnia along with three covariates (i.e., age, co-morbidities, and stage of cancer) was a good fit to the data (Likelihood Ratio Chi-Square 0.875; 2 d.f.; p = 0.646). Parameter estimates indicate a statistically significant effect from the model was the 3-way interaction of pain, fatigue, and insomnia. Gender did not make a difference. Also, the delta difference test shows that age, co-morbidities, and stage of cancer are not significant covariates. By understanding this symptom cluster, oncology nurses can target specific troublesome symptoms to optimize symptom management and achieve the delivery of high quality cancer care.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
31st Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Boston, Massachusetts, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA STUDY ON THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN FATIGUE, PAIN, INSOMNIA, AND GENDER IN PERSONS WITH LUNG CANCERen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHoffman, Amyen_US
dc.contributor.authorGiven, Barbara A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorVon Eye, Alexanderen_US
dc.contributor.authorGiven, Charles W.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGift, Audrey G.en_US
dc.author.detailsAmy Hoffman, MSN, RN, Cancer Research Pre-Doctoral Fellowship, Michigan State University, Lansing, Michigan, USA, email: ahoffman32@aol.com; Barbara A. Given, Amy Hoffman, Alexander Von Eye, Charles W. Given, and Audrey G. Giften_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165388-
dc.description.abstractTopic: Lung cancer is a disease with serious concurrent symptoms, such as fatigue, pain, and insomnia for both men and women. Investigating symptoms that may cluster together in specific cancer populations is important and is relatively new to nursing. Likewise, the study of gender differences to improve nursing-sensitive patient outcomes such as symptom status has become prominent. Targeting interventions towards symptom clusters and gender differences may identify those with lung cancer who could benefit from tailored symptom management protocol. Purpose: For recently diagnosed persons with lung cancer, this study examined the relationship between fatigue, pain, insomnia, and gender, while controlling for age, co-morbidities, and stage of cancer. Framework: The Theory of Unpleasant Symptoms (TOUS) was used to guide this study. The TOUS conceptualizes symptoms as occurring together and identifies categories of antecedents to the symptoms. Methods: Secondary data analysis from baseline observation of a randomized clinical intervention trial was performed on 80 persons with lung cancer using only their pre-chemotherapy information. Multinomial log-linear modeling was performed to identify the most parsimonious model from the saturated model to explain the relationships between fatigue, pain, insomnia, and gender. Findings: Among patients with lung cancer, fatigue (94%) and pain (67%) were the most frequently occurring symptoms with insomnia occurring 50% of the time. A model containing all main effects; 2-way interactions of fatigue and pain, pain and insomnia, and insomnia and gender; and the 3-way interaction of fatigue, pain, and insomnia along with three covariates (i.e., age, co-morbidities, and stage of cancer) was a good fit to the data (Likelihood Ratio Chi-Square 0.875; 2 d.f.; p = 0.646). Parameter estimates indicate a statistically significant effect from the model was the 3-way interaction of pain, fatigue, and insomnia. Gender did not make a difference. Also, the delta difference test shows that age, co-morbidities, and stage of cancer are not significant covariates. By understanding this symptom cluster, oncology nurses can target specific troublesome symptoms to optimize symptom management and achieve the delivery of high quality cancer care.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:17:39Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:17:39Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name31st Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationBoston, Massachusetts, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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