Factors Influencing Fatigue During and After Chemotherapy: Results of a Feasibility Sleep Intervention Study

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165389
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Factors Influencing Fatigue During and After Chemotherapy: Results of a Feasibility Sleep Intervention Study
Author(s):
Berger, Ann; Piper, Barbara; Higginbotham, P.
Author Details:
Ann Berger, RN, PhD, AOCN, FAAN, Associate Professor, University of Nebraska Medical Center, College of Nursing, Omaha, Nebraska, USA, email: aberger@unmc.edu; Barbara Piper; P. Higginbotham
Abstract:
SIGNIFICANCE: The number of women undergoing adjuvant breast cancer chemotherapy continues to increase due to the aging of baby boomers and use of more aggressive first-line therapies. Previous descriptive research has found that symptoms, physical functioning, psychological status, activity/rest and sleep/wake patterns are associated with fatigue in women during and after treatments. PURPOSE: A behavioral intervention promoting quality sleep was tested to determine its impact on sleep and fatigue during and after adjuvant breast cancer chemotherapy. THEORETICAL FRAMEWORK: Piper’s Integrated Fatigue Model METHODS: Prospective, repeated measures, feasibility design; enrolled 25 post-op women with Stage I or II breast cancer, receiving four cycles of Adriamycin-based chemotherapy. Mean age 54.3, most were married, employed full or part time , with some college education. After the four cycles of Adriamycin-based chemotherapy, 21 women remained in the study until the last measurement, of which 8 also had 4 cycles of Taxol, 10 also had radiation, and 18 were taking Tamoxifen. Instruments used had adequate reliability and validity, and included: Symptom Experience Scale, MOS- SF-36, wrist actigraph, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, Morin Sleep Diary, and Piper Fatigue Scale. SPSS was used to test relationships among variables at 8 times over 1 year beginning with the first treatment. FINDINGS: During all 4 cycles of chemotherapy, night awakenings combined with symptoms at cycles 1 and 2, sleep latency at cycle 3 and anxiety at cycle 4 contributed significantly to fatigue intensity (p<.05-.007). At all times after chemotherapy, symptoms contributed significantly to fatigue. Symptoms combined with length/naps were significant 30 days afterwards; physical functioning status and depression were significant 60 and 90 days afterwards and 1 year after the first chemotherapy treatment (p<.05-.003). Additional contributors to later fatigue combined with symptoms at various times were: decreased sleep efficiency, sleep quality, increased night awakenings or anxiety. IMPLICATIONS: Interventions that focus on reducing disruptions from symptoms and maintain physical functioning, psychological status, activity/rest and sleep/wake patterns are most likely to modify fatigue during and after chemotherapy. Interventions should be tailored and contain elements from each of these areas, with particular emphasis on symptoms, especially sleep disturbances.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2003
Conference Name:
28th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Denver, Colorado, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFactors Influencing Fatigue During and After Chemotherapy: Results of a Feasibility Sleep Intervention Studyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBerger, Annen_US
dc.contributor.authorPiper, Barbaraen_US
dc.contributor.authorHigginbotham, P.en_US
dc.author.detailsAnn Berger, RN, PhD, AOCN, FAAN, Associate Professor, University of Nebraska Medical Center, College of Nursing, Omaha, Nebraska, USA, email: aberger@unmc.edu; Barbara Piper; P. Higginbothamen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165389-
dc.description.abstractSIGNIFICANCE: The number of women undergoing adjuvant breast cancer chemotherapy continues to increase due to the aging of baby boomers and use of more aggressive first-line therapies. Previous descriptive research has found that symptoms, physical functioning, psychological status, activity/rest and sleep/wake patterns are associated with fatigue in women during and after treatments. PURPOSE: A behavioral intervention promoting quality sleep was tested to determine its impact on sleep and fatigue during and after adjuvant breast cancer chemotherapy. THEORETICAL FRAMEWORK: Piper&rsquo;s Integrated Fatigue Model METHODS: Prospective, repeated measures, feasibility design; enrolled 25 post-op women with Stage I or II breast cancer, receiving four cycles of Adriamycin-based chemotherapy. Mean age 54.3, most were married, employed full or part time , with some college education. After the four cycles of Adriamycin-based chemotherapy, 21 women remained in the study until the last measurement, of which 8 also had 4 cycles of Taxol, 10 also had radiation, and 18 were taking Tamoxifen. Instruments used had adequate reliability and validity, and included: Symptom Experience Scale, MOS- SF-36, wrist actigraph, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, Morin Sleep Diary, and Piper Fatigue Scale. SPSS was used to test relationships among variables at 8 times over 1 year beginning with the first treatment. FINDINGS: During all 4 cycles of chemotherapy, night awakenings combined with symptoms at cycles 1 and 2, sleep latency at cycle 3 and anxiety at cycle 4 contributed significantly to fatigue intensity (p&lt;.05-.007). At all times after chemotherapy, symptoms contributed significantly to fatigue. Symptoms combined with length/naps were significant 30 days afterwards; physical functioning status and depression were significant 60 and 90 days afterwards and 1 year after the first chemotherapy treatment (p&lt;.05-.003). Additional contributors to later fatigue combined with symptoms at various times were: decreased sleep efficiency, sleep quality, increased night awakenings or anxiety. IMPLICATIONS: Interventions that focus on reducing disruptions from symptoms and maintain physical functioning, psychological status, activity/rest and sleep/wake patterns are most likely to modify fatigue during and after chemotherapy. Interventions should be tailored and contain elements from each of these areas, with particular emphasis on symptoms, especially sleep disturbances.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:17:40Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:17:40Z-
dc.conference.date2003en_US
dc.conference.name28th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationDenver, Colorado, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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