Sleep, Fatigue, and Depressive Symptoms in Breast Cancer Survivors and Matched Healthy Women Experiencing Hot Flashes

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165392
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Sleep, Fatigue, and Depressive Symptoms in Breast Cancer Survivors and Matched Healthy Women Experiencing Hot Flashes
Author(s):
Carpenter, Janet; Ridner, S. H.; Carney, P.; Cherry, G. J.; Cucullu, H.
Author Details:
Janet Carpenter, PhD, Assistant Professor, Vanderbilt University, School of Nursing, Nashville, Tennessee, USA, Email: janet.s.carpenter@vanderbilt.edu; S. H. Ridner; P. Carney; G. J. Cherry; H. Cucullu
Abstract:
PURPOSE/OBJECTIVES: (1) to compare sleep quality and disturbance, fatigue and depressive symptoms between breast cancer survivors (BCS) and healthy women (HW) experiencing hot flashes and (2) to examine relationships between sleep and remaining variables (fatigue, depressive symptoms, and hot flash frequency). THEORETICAL/SCIENTIFIC FRAMEWORK: Lenz Theory of Unpleasant Symptoms. Design: Cross-sectional, descriptive, comparative study. Sample: 15 BCS and 15 HW matched on age, race, and menopausal status from a University based outpatient setting. All women had untreated hot flashes (no hormone replacement therapy or other hot flash treatments). METHODS: Questionnaires (sleep quality and disturbance, fatigue, and depression), two ambulatory 24-hour sternal skin conductance monitoring sessions (hot flash frequency), and medical records review. DATA ANALYSIS: t-tests, chi square, Mann -Whitney, Pearson correlation, and nonparametric Spearman's rho. FINDINGS: The majority evidenced poor sleep quality and high sleep disturbance (73% of BCS and 67% of HW above a cutoff score of 5). Sleep duration was significantly shorter for BCS in comparison to HW (p < .05). Nighttime flashes were experienced by 67% of BCS and 37% of HW. No group differences were found fatigue, depressive symptoms, or objective hot flash frequency. Global sleep scores were significantly correlated with fatigue and depression, but not with hot flash frequency. CONCLUSIONS: Findings suggest sleep disturbance is common in menopausal BCS and HW, is not necessarily related to hot flashes, and may stem from a multifactorial etiology. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING PRACTICE: Menopausal BCS who present with any one of these symptoms should be screened for all symptoms both during and after treatment.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2003
Conference Name:
28th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Denver, Colorado, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSleep, Fatigue, and Depressive Symptoms in Breast Cancer Survivors and Matched Healthy Women Experiencing Hot Flashesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCarpenter, Janeten_US
dc.contributor.authorRidner, S. H.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCarney, P.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCherry, G. J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCucullu, H.en_US
dc.author.detailsJanet Carpenter, PhD, Assistant Professor, Vanderbilt University, School of Nursing, Nashville, Tennessee, USA, Email: janet.s.carpenter@vanderbilt.edu; S. H. Ridner; P. Carney; G. J. Cherry; H. Cuculluen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165392-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE/OBJECTIVES: (1) to compare sleep quality and disturbance, fatigue and depressive symptoms between breast cancer survivors (BCS) and healthy women (HW) experiencing hot flashes and (2) to examine relationships between sleep and remaining variables (fatigue, depressive symptoms, and hot flash frequency). THEORETICAL/SCIENTIFIC FRAMEWORK: Lenz Theory of Unpleasant Symptoms. Design: Cross-sectional, descriptive, comparative study. Sample: 15 BCS and 15 HW matched on age, race, and menopausal status from a University based outpatient setting. All women had untreated hot flashes (no hormone replacement therapy or other hot flash treatments). METHODS: Questionnaires (sleep quality and disturbance, fatigue, and depression), two ambulatory 24-hour sternal skin conductance monitoring sessions (hot flash frequency), and medical records review. DATA ANALYSIS: t-tests, chi square, Mann -Whitney, Pearson correlation, and nonparametric Spearman's rho. FINDINGS: The majority evidenced poor sleep quality and high sleep disturbance (73% of BCS and 67% of HW above a cutoff score of 5). Sleep duration was significantly shorter for BCS in comparison to HW (p &lt; .05). Nighttime flashes were experienced by 67% of BCS and 37% of HW. No group differences were found fatigue, depressive symptoms, or objective hot flash frequency. Global sleep scores were significantly correlated with fatigue and depression, but not with hot flash frequency. CONCLUSIONS: Findings suggest sleep disturbance is common in menopausal BCS and HW, is not necessarily related to hot flashes, and may stem from a multifactorial etiology. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING PRACTICE: Menopausal BCS who present with any one of these symptoms should be screened for all symptoms both during and after treatment.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:17:43Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:17:43Z-
dc.conference.date2003en_US
dc.conference.name28th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationDenver, Colorado, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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