2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165394
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
What it Takes to Make Cooperative Care Work
Author(s):
Eilers, June; Kimpson, B.; Heermann, J.; Wilson, M.; Knutson, S.
Author Details:
June Eilers, PhD, Nebraska Health System, University Hospital, Ralston, Nebraska, USA; B. Kimpson; J. Heermann; M. Wilson; S. Knutson
Abstract:
SIGNIFICANCE: Responsibility for significant aspects of cancer care has shifted to lay caregivers. Cooperative Care (CC) is an example of an alternative acute care model being utilized. CC is based on a partnership between a patient/lay caregiver dyad and health care professionals. Lay caregivers deliver direct care, but nurses in such settings remain responsible for outcomes of care. Preparation of the patient/caregiver dyad to assume care responsibility is a key nursing intervention. Patients and caregivers cannot be permitted to experience the consequences of inadequate or inappropriate caregiving. Thus, identification of independent nursing activities, which aim to improve outcomes, is critical to nursing’s ability to evaluate interventions designed to educate/prepare the lay caregivers. PURPOSE: to articulate the nature of independent nursing activities in CC. The aim was to describe the activities and how nurses determine lay care partner’s need for assistance. FRAMEWORK: The Nursing Process. Nursing is defined as having two types of functions: independent and interdependent activities. This study focuses on the independent activities. METHOD: qualitative study. Audio-taped focus groups were conducted with the 9 CC nurses as expert informants. DATA ANALYSIS: Focus group transcripts were reviewed for accuracy and analyzed by the research team using Spradleys domain analysis technique. Qualitative research strategies including searching for negative evidence, maintaining an audit trail, and member checks insured rigor of the analysis. FINDINGS: Among the independent activities identified were teaching, reinforcing, coaching, directing, supporting, translating medical information, and reassuring. Themes revealed nurses learned to make CC work by using a phased approach based on the clinical progression of the patient/caregiver dyad. They practice an integrated process of recognition of triggers and initiation of concomitant activities aimed at building the dyad’s sense of confidence. IMPLICATIONS: Articulation and quantification of independent nursing activities are critical to nursing in the clinical setting. An instrument to measure independent nursing activities in CC is being developed in the program of research that includes this study. The instrument will aid nursing in communicating CC nursing to others and facilitate the evaluation of research based interventions.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2003
Conference Name:
28th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Denver, Colorado, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWhat it Takes to Make Cooperative Care Worken_GB
dc.contributor.authorEilers, Juneen_US
dc.contributor.authorKimpson, B.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHeermann, J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorWilson, M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKnutson, S.en_US
dc.author.detailsJune Eilers, PhD, Nebraska Health System, University Hospital, Ralston, Nebraska, USA; B. Kimpson; J. Heermann; M. Wilson; S. Knutsonen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165394-
dc.description.abstractSIGNIFICANCE: Responsibility for significant aspects of cancer care has shifted to lay caregivers. Cooperative Care (CC) is an example of an alternative acute care model being utilized. CC is based on a partnership between a patient/lay caregiver dyad and health care professionals. Lay caregivers deliver direct care, but nurses in such settings remain responsible for outcomes of care. Preparation of the patient/caregiver dyad to assume care responsibility is a key nursing intervention. Patients and caregivers cannot be permitted to experience the consequences of inadequate or inappropriate caregiving. Thus, identification of independent nursing activities, which aim to improve outcomes, is critical to nursing’s ability to evaluate interventions designed to educate/prepare the lay caregivers. PURPOSE: to articulate the nature of independent nursing activities in CC. The aim was to describe the activities and how nurses determine lay care partner’s need for assistance. FRAMEWORK: The Nursing Process. Nursing is defined as having two types of functions: independent and interdependent activities. This study focuses on the independent activities. METHOD: qualitative study. Audio-taped focus groups were conducted with the 9 CC nurses as expert informants. DATA ANALYSIS: Focus group transcripts were reviewed for accuracy and analyzed by the research team using Spradleys domain analysis technique. Qualitative research strategies including searching for negative evidence, maintaining an audit trail, and member checks insured rigor of the analysis. FINDINGS: Among the independent activities identified were teaching, reinforcing, coaching, directing, supporting, translating medical information, and reassuring. Themes revealed nurses learned to make CC work by using a phased approach based on the clinical progression of the patient/caregiver dyad. They practice an integrated process of recognition of triggers and initiation of concomitant activities aimed at building the dyad’s sense of confidence. IMPLICATIONS: Articulation and quantification of independent nursing activities are critical to nursing in the clinical setting. An instrument to measure independent nursing activities in CC is being developed in the program of research that includes this study. The instrument will aid nursing in communicating CC nursing to others and facilitate the evaluation of research based interventions.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:17:45Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:17:45Z-
dc.conference.date2003en_US
dc.conference.name28th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationDenver, Colorado, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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