A Pilot Study Comparing Pain Intensity, Information Seeking, and Adjustment to Prostate Cancer and Metastasis in First Generation Japanese American Men and Third-Generation European American Men

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165395
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Pilot Study Comparing Pain Intensity, Information Seeking, and Adjustment to Prostate Cancer and Metastasis in First Generation Japanese American Men and Third-Generation European American Men
Author(s):
Kowalski, Mildred
Author Details:
Mildred Kowalski, MPA, Research Scientist, Novartis Pharmaceuticals, East Hanover, New Jersey, USA
Abstract:
Adjustment to illness is a complicated, multi-dimensional and difficult process for many patients facing a chronic or life-threatening illness. Adjustment encompasses changes in social interactions, physical limitations and resultant alterations in role function (Germino et al., 1998; Hoskins, 1995; Hoskins et al., 1996; Northouse & Swain, 1987). Each aspect of adjustment interfaces with categories of behaviors, defined by the Roy Adaptations Model (RAM) (Boston Based Adaptation Research in Nursing Society [BBARNS, 1999). In this study, the term adjustment is used to denote the process of adaptation, as conceptualized by Roy (BBARNS, 1999; Roy, 1976) and will be measured using the Psychosocial Adjustment to Illness Scale (PAIS) (Derogatis & Derogatis, 1990). As the United States becomes increasingly more culturally diverse, nurses are challenged to care for patients from different cultural backgrounds. Prostate cancer is more prevalent in Japanese American men than it is in Japanese men. The purpose of this descriptive study is to explore cultural differences in self-reporting of pain (using the Brief Pain Inventory), information seeking behavior (using a modified Krantz Health Opinion Survey) and adjustment (using the PAIS). A pilot study (N=20) is in progress in Honolulu. Information about cultural behavior was obtained from 11 consenting men with prostate cancer. Patients with recent (within six weeks) surgery or residual surgical pain and patients with untreated brain metastasis were excluded. Surveys are provided in English; therefore, only English speaking patients are included in this study. The purposes of the pilot study are to test the validity of the KHOS instrument when completed by patients with prostate cancer, as well as to gain experience with the research procedures in this diverse population. After completion of the pilot study, the necessary changes will be made to the instruments and/or procedures prior to initiating the core study of 84 participants. Results of the core study will be analyzed by t-test comparisons between second generation Japanese American and third generation European American men, for each of the three variables. The results of this research may provide insight into how nurse can better care for patients with prostate cancer from diverse cultural backgrounds.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2003
Conference Name:
28th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Denver, Colorado, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Pilot Study Comparing Pain Intensity, Information Seeking, and Adjustment to Prostate Cancer and Metastasis in First Generation Japanese American Men and Third-Generation European American Menen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKowalski, Mildreden_US
dc.author.detailsMildred Kowalski, MPA, Research Scientist, Novartis Pharmaceuticals, East Hanover, New Jersey, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165395-
dc.description.abstractAdjustment to illness is a complicated, multi-dimensional and difficult process for many patients facing a chronic or life-threatening illness. Adjustment encompasses changes in social interactions, physical limitations and resultant alterations in role function (Germino et al., 1998; Hoskins, 1995; Hoskins et al., 1996; Northouse & Swain, 1987). Each aspect of adjustment interfaces with categories of behaviors, defined by the Roy Adaptations Model (RAM) (Boston Based Adaptation Research in Nursing Society [BBARNS, 1999). In this study, the term adjustment is used to denote the process of adaptation, as conceptualized by Roy (BBARNS, 1999; Roy, 1976) and will be measured using the Psychosocial Adjustment to Illness Scale (PAIS) (Derogatis & Derogatis, 1990). As the United States becomes increasingly more culturally diverse, nurses are challenged to care for patients from different cultural backgrounds. Prostate cancer is more prevalent in Japanese American men than it is in Japanese men. The purpose of this descriptive study is to explore cultural differences in self-reporting of pain (using the Brief Pain Inventory), information seeking behavior (using a modified Krantz Health Opinion Survey) and adjustment (using the PAIS). A pilot study (N=20) is in progress in Honolulu. Information about cultural behavior was obtained from 11 consenting men with prostate cancer. Patients with recent (within six weeks) surgery or residual surgical pain and patients with untreated brain metastasis were excluded. Surveys are provided in English; therefore, only English speaking patients are included in this study. The purposes of the pilot study are to test the validity of the KHOS instrument when completed by patients with prostate cancer, as well as to gain experience with the research procedures in this diverse population. After completion of the pilot study, the necessary changes will be made to the instruments and/or procedures prior to initiating the core study of 84 participants. Results of the core study will be analyzed by t-test comparisons between second generation Japanese American and third generation European American men, for each of the three variables. The results of this research may provide insight into how nurse can better care for patients with prostate cancer from diverse cultural backgrounds.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:17:46Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:17:46Z-
dc.conference.date2003en_US
dc.conference.name28th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationDenver, Colorado, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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