2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165396
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Informational Needs of Korean Patients Receiving Chemotherapy
Author(s):
Lee, Eun-Hyun; Choi, J. H.
Author Details:
Eun-Hyun Lee, PhD, Instructor, Ajou University, Division of Nursing Science, Suwon, South Korea, email: ehlee@madan.ajou.ac.kr; J. H. Choi
Abstract:
In a threatening situation, people need information to better understand what is happening and to formulate realistic expectations about the situation. Cancer and its treatments are usually perceived for patients as a threatening situation. However, it has been rarely studied what kinds of information Korean patients with cancer want. Thus, the purpose of this study was to assess the information needs of Korean patients receiving chemotherapy. A cross-sectional, descriptive design was used to assess the information needs. Participates were recruited from a university hospital in South Korea. The sample consisted of 125 Korean patients receiving chemotherapy for stomach, lung or breast cancer. To assess the information needs, the Information Needs Scale for Korean Patients Undergoing Chemotherapy (INS-C) was used. The instrument consists of six domains. Each item has 5-point Likert scale from 1 (do not want to know) to 5 (want to know very much). From a factor analysis, six domains were derived significantly: Side Effect and Investigative Test (9 items), Spread of Disease (4 items), Financial Cost (2 items), Treatment (7 items), Activity and Diet (6 items), and Interrelationship and Support (5 items). The Cronbach’s alpha of the total INS-C was .95, and the alphas of the domain ranged from .77 to .91. The INS-C was distributed to the patients, who wished to participate, and completed at a small room while waiting for the administration of chemotherapy. Data were analyzed using SPSS. The highest mean score of the domains was Spread Disease (M = 4.06, SD = .79), followed by Treatment (M = 3.99, SD = .69), Side Effect and Investigative Test (M = 3.94, SD = .64), Activity and Diet (M = 3.85, SD = .71), Financial Cost (M = 3.83, SD =.87), and Interrelationship and Support (M = 3.28, SD = .77). Age was negatively correlated with the domain of the Spread of Disease (r = - .18). The mean score of the Financial Cost was significantly higher in the patient group with metastasized cancer than those with non-metastasized cancer (t = 2.26, p = .026). There were no differences in total and domain scores between marital status, education, income, and type of cancer. The results revealed that Korean cancer patients had high informational needs over all domains. Younger patients with cancer greater need for information than older women. Patients with metastasized cancer had greater need for the information on financial cost for their treatment than with non-metastasized cancer. Health care providers should give information related to cancer and its treatment considering of the age and metastasis of patients.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2003
Conference Name:
28th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Denver, Colorado, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleInformational Needs of Korean Patients Receiving Chemotherapyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLee, Eun-Hyunen_US
dc.contributor.authorChoi, J. H.en_US
dc.author.detailsEun-Hyun Lee, PhD, Instructor, Ajou University, Division of Nursing Science, Suwon, South Korea, email: ehlee@madan.ajou.ac.kr; J. H. Choien_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165396-
dc.description.abstractIn a threatening situation, people need information to better understand what is happening and to formulate realistic expectations about the situation. Cancer and its treatments are usually perceived for patients as a threatening situation. However, it has been rarely studied what kinds of information Korean patients with cancer want. Thus, the purpose of this study was to assess the information needs of Korean patients receiving chemotherapy. A cross-sectional, descriptive design was used to assess the information needs. Participates were recruited from a university hospital in South Korea. The sample consisted of 125 Korean patients receiving chemotherapy for stomach, lung or breast cancer. To assess the information needs, the Information Needs Scale for Korean Patients Undergoing Chemotherapy (INS-C) was used. The instrument consists of six domains. Each item has 5-point Likert scale from 1 (do not want to know) to 5 (want to know very much). From a factor analysis, six domains were derived significantly: Side Effect and Investigative Test (9 items), Spread of Disease (4 items), Financial Cost (2 items), Treatment (7 items), Activity and Diet (6 items), and Interrelationship and Support (5 items). The Cronbach’s alpha of the total INS-C was .95, and the alphas of the domain ranged from .77 to .91. The INS-C was distributed to the patients, who wished to participate, and completed at a small room while waiting for the administration of chemotherapy. Data were analyzed using SPSS. The highest mean score of the domains was Spread Disease (M = 4.06, SD = .79), followed by Treatment (M = 3.99, SD = .69), Side Effect and Investigative Test (M = 3.94, SD = .64), Activity and Diet (M = 3.85, SD = .71), Financial Cost (M = 3.83, SD =.87), and Interrelationship and Support (M = 3.28, SD = .77). Age was negatively correlated with the domain of the Spread of Disease (r = - .18). The mean score of the Financial Cost was significantly higher in the patient group with metastasized cancer than those with non-metastasized cancer (t = 2.26, p = .026). There were no differences in total and domain scores between marital status, education, income, and type of cancer. The results revealed that Korean cancer patients had high informational needs over all domains. Younger patients with cancer greater need for information than older women. Patients with metastasized cancer had greater need for the information on financial cost for their treatment than with non-metastasized cancer. Health care providers should give information related to cancer and its treatment considering of the age and metastasis of patients.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:17:47Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:17:47Z-
dc.conference.date2003en_US
dc.conference.name28th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationDenver, Colorado, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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