Perceived Cancer Worry in Women With Hereditary Risk Factors for Breast Cancer

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165397
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Perceived Cancer Worry in Women With Hereditary Risk Factors for Breast Cancer
Author(s):
Loescher, L.
Author Details:
L. Loescher, University of Arizona Cancer Center, Tucson, Arizona, USA
Abstract:
Cancer worry is a phenomenon receiving increased scrutiny by researchers. Studying cancer worry may elucidate its relationship with other variables, such as perceived risk of cancer. Familiarity with cancer worry also may enhance understanding of its impact on decisions to engage in cancer risk-reducing behaviors. Knowledge of the genetic basis of cancers has generated studies of cancer worry in individuals with strong hereditary risk factors for certain cancers. Cognitive emotions theory implies that such individuals may not only worry about if they will get cancer, but when it will occur and what cues may herald its onset. This cross-sectional, descriptive study assessed cancer worry in 200 healthy women with hereditary risk factors for breast cancer. Women were recruited via a mammography center and network sampling. Participants completed demographic questions and the investigator-developed Thoughts about Cancer Scale (TACS) (Cronbach’s alpha = .73; intraclass correlation = .83, fit indices >.0.97). The 6 TACS items were generated from previous qualitative work and the literature. TACS total scores ranged from 6 (rare/never thoughts of cancer) to 24 (think about cancer all the time). Data analysis used frequency distributions, t-tests, and simple regression. Participants were a mean age of 49 years (SD = 14). Most participants worried about breast cancer (81%) and thought about it at least sometimes or more often (86%); however, they rarely/never: thought about cancer when sick (81%), were hypervigilant with breast self-exam (55%), felt breast lumps that were not validated by health care providers (87%) or thought every ache or pain was cancer (85%). Differences of total mean TACS scores of participants who thought about cancer sometimes or more frequently (20%) and those who rarely/never thought about cancer (80%) were significant (t (47) = -13.4, p < .000). Total TACS scores predicted intent to practice cancer screening/prevention behaviors (p = .001) and genetic testing (p = .000), but did not predict perceived absolute risk of cancer. Assessment of general cancer worry may help guide counseling for cancer risk-reduction in women at high risk for breast cancer. Findings support additional research to characterize relationships of cancer worry, perceived risk, and symptom cues.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2003
Conference Name:
28th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Denver, Colorado, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePerceived Cancer Worry in Women With Hereditary Risk Factors for Breast Canceren_GB
dc.contributor.authorLoescher, L.en_US
dc.author.detailsL. Loescher, University of Arizona Cancer Center, Tucson, Arizona, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165397-
dc.description.abstractCancer worry is a phenomenon receiving increased scrutiny by researchers. Studying cancer worry may elucidate its relationship with other variables, such as perceived risk of cancer. Familiarity with cancer worry also may enhance understanding of its impact on decisions to engage in cancer risk-reducing behaviors. Knowledge of the genetic basis of cancers has generated studies of cancer worry in individuals with strong hereditary risk factors for certain cancers. Cognitive emotions theory implies that such individuals may not only worry about if they will get cancer, but when it will occur and what cues may herald its onset. This cross-sectional, descriptive study assessed cancer worry in 200 healthy women with hereditary risk factors for breast cancer. Women were recruited via a mammography center and network sampling. Participants completed demographic questions and the investigator-developed Thoughts about Cancer Scale (TACS) (Cronbach&rsquo;s alpha = .73; intraclass correlation = .83, fit indices &gt;.0.97). The 6 TACS items were generated from previous qualitative work and the literature. TACS total scores ranged from 6 (rare/never thoughts of cancer) to 24 (think about cancer all the time). Data analysis used frequency distributions, t-tests, and simple regression. Participants were a mean age of 49 years (SD = 14). Most participants worried about breast cancer (81%) and thought about it at least sometimes or more often (86%); however, they rarely/never: thought about cancer when sick (81%), were hypervigilant with breast self-exam (55%), felt breast lumps that were not validated by health care providers (87%) or thought every ache or pain was cancer (85%). Differences of total mean TACS scores of participants who thought about cancer sometimes or more frequently (20%) and those who rarely/never thought about cancer (80%) were significant (t (47) = -13.4, p &lt; .000). Total TACS scores predicted intent to practice cancer screening/prevention behaviors (p = .001) and genetic testing (p = .000), but did not predict perceived absolute risk of cancer. Assessment of general cancer worry may help guide counseling for cancer risk-reduction in women at high risk for breast cancer. Findings support additional research to characterize relationships of cancer worry, perceived risk, and symptom cues.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:17:48Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:17:48Z-
dc.conference.date2003en_US
dc.conference.name28th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationDenver, Colorado, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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