2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165398
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Cancer-Related Pain in the Outpatient Clinic
Author(s):
Riley-Doucet, Cheryl; Hazard-Vallerand, April; Hasenau, S. M.; Templin, T.
Author Details:
Cheryl Riley-Doucet, Doctoral Student, Wayne State University, College of Nursing, Detroit, Michigan, USA, email: ag2706@wayne.edu; April Hazard-Vallerand; S. M. Hasenau; T. Templin
Abstract:
The prevalence of uncontrolled cancer-related pain in outpatient adult populations despite claims that pain can be relieved in more than 90% of cases is of significant concern. Research on pain control indicates that perceived control over pain is highly valued by patients and is linked to decreased levels of symptom distress and improved functional status. The purpose of this study was: (1) to investigate the degree to which outpatients with cancer-related pain believe their pain is controllable, (2) to determine the current level of pain control that these patients are experiencing, and (3) to investigate the relationship between pain and symptom distress, perception of control over pain, and functional status in this patient population. The Conceptual Model of Symptom Management served as the study’s conceptual framework. An exploratory/descriptive, cross sectional design was the method used for this study. Adult patients (n=247) 18 years and older, who were receiving treatment at a large urban cancer center and had experienced pain in the previous two weeks were asked to complete the study questionnaires. Data analysis revealed that the majority of patients believed that their pain was controllable (89%). However, the mean worst pain score reported in the previous two weeks was 6.33 (range 1-10), indicating moderate to severe pain. Patients with higher pain severity, increased distress, decreased functional status and more barriers to pain control were found to have a significantly lower perception of control over pain. Patients with higher perceived control over pain were also found to be significantly more knowledgeable regarding pain control. Findings support the relationship between perceived control over pain, decreased pain severity, symptom distress, and functional status. Decreased levels of pain may lead to increased perceived control over pain, decreased symptom distress, and improved functional status in patients with cancer.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2003
Conference Name:
28th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Denver, Colorado, USA
Sponsors:
The Detroit Medical Center/Wayne State University College of Nursing Scholar Award funded this study.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCancer-Related Pain in the Outpatient Clinicen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRiley-Doucet, Cherylen_US
dc.contributor.authorHazard-Vallerand, Aprilen_US
dc.contributor.authorHasenau, S. M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorTemplin, T.en_US
dc.author.detailsCheryl Riley-Doucet, Doctoral Student, Wayne State University, College of Nursing, Detroit, Michigan, USA, email: ag2706@wayne.edu; April Hazard-Vallerand; S. M. Hasenau; T. Templinen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165398-
dc.description.abstractThe prevalence of uncontrolled cancer-related pain in outpatient adult populations despite claims that pain can be relieved in more than 90% of cases is of significant concern. Research on pain control indicates that perceived control over pain is highly valued by patients and is linked to decreased levels of symptom distress and improved functional status. The purpose of this study was: (1) to investigate the degree to which outpatients with cancer-related pain believe their pain is controllable, (2) to determine the current level of pain control that these patients are experiencing, and (3) to investigate the relationship between pain and symptom distress, perception of control over pain, and functional status in this patient population. The Conceptual Model of Symptom Management served as the study’s conceptual framework. An exploratory/descriptive, cross sectional design was the method used for this study. Adult patients (n=247) 18 years and older, who were receiving treatment at a large urban cancer center and had experienced pain in the previous two weeks were asked to complete the study questionnaires. Data analysis revealed that the majority of patients believed that their pain was controllable (89%). However, the mean worst pain score reported in the previous two weeks was 6.33 (range 1-10), indicating moderate to severe pain. Patients with higher pain severity, increased distress, decreased functional status and more barriers to pain control were found to have a significantly lower perception of control over pain. Patients with higher perceived control over pain were also found to be significantly more knowledgeable regarding pain control. Findings support the relationship between perceived control over pain, decreased pain severity, symptom distress, and functional status. Decreased levels of pain may lead to increased perceived control over pain, decreased symptom distress, and improved functional status in patients with cancer.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:17:50Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:17:50Z-
dc.conference.date2003en_US
dc.conference.name28th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationDenver, Colorado, USAen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThe Detroit Medical Center/Wayne State University College of Nursing Scholar Award funded this study.-
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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