2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165399
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Response to Antioxidant Supplements During Radiotherapy
Author(s):
Brown, Jean; Horvath, P.; Melton, R.
Author Details:
Jean Brown, University of Buffalo at SUNY, School of Nursing Buffalo, New York, USA, email: jebrown@buffalo.edu; P. Horvath; R. Melton
Abstract:
Use of antioxidant supplements by patients during radiotherapy (RT) is controversial. Opponents of antioxidants argue that they interfere with treatment by repairing cells the treatment is trying to destroy; whereas proponents argue beneficial net effects in that normal cells are repaired more quickly minimizing side effects and maximizing recovery. The purpose of this study was to compare nutrition-related symptoms, weight change, tumor response, and quality of life in patients receiving RT who used antioxidant supplements with those who did not. A biopsychosocial framework grounded in the laws of energy balance conceptualized cancer-related weight change, its predictors, and its physiological, functional, social, and psychological outcomes. Using a prospective correlational design, data were collected over 10-12 weeks at the beginning, end, and 4-6 weeks after RT from 8 clinical sites. The convenience sample included 55 patients with non-small cell lung cancer; 65% were stages IIIB and IV. The mean age was 67.4 years (SD=10.7), 38% were female, and 93% were White. The Lung Cancer Symptom Scale and the Rand Health Survey 1.0 were used to measure symptoms and quality of life. Both instruments have well-established reliability and validity. Weights were measured according established methods using a standardized protocol, and tumor response was obtained from the post-RT medical records. Descriptive statistics, t-tests, and chi-square were used. 34.5% were taking antioxidant supplements during RT. The symptoms of anorexia and dysphagia were consistently less severe among those taking antioxidants across all measurement time points. In contrast, fatigue was greater in the antioxidant users at baseline and post-RT but less at the end of treatment. Weight change over time was less in the antioxidant users. 55.6% of antioxidant users had partial or complete tumor response vs. 35.6% of non-users. Quality of life scores were higher for antioxidant users at baseline, but lower at end of treatment and post-RT. None of the differences were statistically significant indicating that the use of antioxidants during RT may have little or no effect on study outcomes. The major limitation was self-selection bias, and a randomized clinical trial is needed to eliminate this problem.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2003
Conference Name:
28th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Denver, Colorado, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleResponse to Antioxidant Supplements During Radiotherapyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBrown, Jeanen_US
dc.contributor.authorHorvath, P.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMelton, R.en_US
dc.author.detailsJean Brown, University of Buffalo at SUNY, School of Nursing Buffalo, New York, USA, email: jebrown@buffalo.edu; P. Horvath; R. Meltonen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165399-
dc.description.abstractUse of antioxidant supplements by patients during radiotherapy (RT) is controversial. Opponents of antioxidants argue that they interfere with treatment by repairing cells the treatment is trying to destroy; whereas proponents argue beneficial net effects in that normal cells are repaired more quickly minimizing side effects and maximizing recovery. The purpose of this study was to compare nutrition-related symptoms, weight change, tumor response, and quality of life in patients receiving RT who used antioxidant supplements with those who did not. A biopsychosocial framework grounded in the laws of energy balance conceptualized cancer-related weight change, its predictors, and its physiological, functional, social, and psychological outcomes. Using a prospective correlational design, data were collected over 10-12 weeks at the beginning, end, and 4-6 weeks after RT from 8 clinical sites. The convenience sample included 55 patients with non-small cell lung cancer; 65% were stages IIIB and IV. The mean age was 67.4 years (SD=10.7), 38% were female, and 93% were White. The Lung Cancer Symptom Scale and the Rand Health Survey 1.0 were used to measure symptoms and quality of life. Both instruments have well-established reliability and validity. Weights were measured according established methods using a standardized protocol, and tumor response was obtained from the post-RT medical records. Descriptive statistics, t-tests, and chi-square were used. 34.5% were taking antioxidant supplements during RT. The symptoms of anorexia and dysphagia were consistently less severe among those taking antioxidants across all measurement time points. In contrast, fatigue was greater in the antioxidant users at baseline and post-RT but less at the end of treatment. Weight change over time was less in the antioxidant users. 55.6% of antioxidant users had partial or complete tumor response vs. 35.6% of non-users. Quality of life scores were higher for antioxidant users at baseline, but lower at end of treatment and post-RT. None of the differences were statistically significant indicating that the use of antioxidants during RT may have little or no effect on study outcomes. The major limitation was self-selection bias, and a randomized clinical trial is needed to eliminate this problem.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:17:51Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:17:51Z-
dc.conference.date2003en_US
dc.conference.name28th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationDenver, Colorado, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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