2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165402
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Pilot Test of a Sleep Intervention for Caregivers of People With Cancer
Author(s):
Carter, Patricia
Author Details:
Patricia Carter, Assistant Professor, University of Texas-Austin, School of Nursing, Austin, Texas, USA, email: pcarter@mail.nur.utexas.edu
Abstract:
PROBLEM/PURPOSE: Caregivers report levels of depression that impact daily functioning, quality of life, and ability to continue to caregiving. Depression is a normal response to a family member’s diagnosis with cancer; however, other factors amenable to intervention may severely exacerbate depressive symptoms. This pilot study explored the feasibility of a behavioral intervention to improve sleep quality and decrease depressive symptoms in caregivers of persons with advanced stage cancer. FRAMEWORK: Caregiving is a complex bio-psycho-social process whose outcomes are dependent upon individuals’ perceptions of their experience as well as appraisal of their ability to meet the demands presented by caregiving. This study used the stress and coping framework of Lazarus and Folkman (1984). METHODS: An experimental repeated measures design was used. Recruitment occurred at outpatient oncology centers. Data was collected in caregivers’ homes. Inclusion criteria were: >18 years of age, co-residing with a cancer patient receiving treatment, fluent in English, and freely consenting. Caregivers were excluded if they were diagnosed with sleep and/or psychological disorders. Following consent, caregivers were randomized to waitlist control and intervention groups. Sleep (PSQI) and depression (CESD) measures were taken at weeks 1, 3 & 5. All caregivers wore the Actigraph for 72 hours at weeks 1, 3 & 5. The intervention was given at weeks 2 and 4. Twelve caregivers have completed the study (target sample = 30). FINDINGS/IMPLICATIONS: Participants were 50% female, 75% Caucasian, and 25% African-American, with a mean age of 50 years; primarily spouses (67%), others were adult children (8%) and partners (17%). While sleep and depression improved across groups, the intervention group showed significant improvement over the waitlist controls (PSQI p<0.04 & CESD p<0.05). Caregivers reported that the intervention procedures were easily followed and helpful. These preliminary data suggest the feasibility of the sleep intervention and of the measurement methods chosen. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: Oncology nurses provide support, education, and resource information to patients and families. This research provides preliminary information about the feasibility of a sleep intervention that, in the future, may be used by oncology nurses to promote physical and emotional health in their caregiver population.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2003
Conference Name:
28th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Denver, Colorado, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePilot Test of a Sleep Intervention for Caregivers of People With Canceren_GB
dc.contributor.authorCarter, Patriciaen_US
dc.author.detailsPatricia Carter, Assistant Professor, University of Texas-Austin, School of Nursing, Austin, Texas, USA, email: pcarter@mail.nur.utexas.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165402-
dc.description.abstractPROBLEM/PURPOSE: Caregivers report levels of depression that impact daily functioning, quality of life, and ability to continue to caregiving. Depression is a normal response to a family member&rsquo;s diagnosis with cancer; however, other factors amenable to intervention may severely exacerbate depressive symptoms. This pilot study explored the feasibility of a behavioral intervention to improve sleep quality and decrease depressive symptoms in caregivers of persons with advanced stage cancer. FRAMEWORK: Caregiving is a complex bio-psycho-social process whose outcomes are dependent upon individuals&rsquo; perceptions of their experience as well as appraisal of their ability to meet the demands presented by caregiving. This study used the stress and coping framework of Lazarus and Folkman (1984). METHODS: An experimental repeated measures design was used. Recruitment occurred at outpatient oncology centers. Data was collected in caregivers&rsquo; homes. Inclusion criteria were: &gt;18 years of age, co-residing with a cancer patient receiving treatment, fluent in English, and freely consenting. Caregivers were excluded if they were diagnosed with sleep and/or psychological disorders. Following consent, caregivers were randomized to waitlist control and intervention groups. Sleep (PSQI) and depression (CESD) measures were taken at weeks 1, 3 &amp; 5. All caregivers wore the Actigraph for 72 hours at weeks 1, 3 &amp; 5. The intervention was given at weeks 2 and 4. Twelve caregivers have completed the study (target sample = 30). FINDINGS/IMPLICATIONS: Participants were 50% female, 75% Caucasian, and 25% African-American, with a mean age of 50 years; primarily spouses (67%), others were adult children (8%) and partners (17%). While sleep and depression improved across groups, the intervention group showed significant improvement over the waitlist controls (PSQI p&lt;0.04 &amp; CESD p&lt;0.05). Caregivers reported that the intervention procedures were easily followed and helpful. These preliminary data suggest the feasibility of the sleep intervention and of the measurement methods chosen. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: Oncology nurses provide support, education, and resource information to patients and families. This research provides preliminary information about the feasibility of a sleep intervention that, in the future, may be used by oncology nurses to promote physical and emotional health in their caregiver population.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:17:54Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:17:54Z-
dc.conference.date2003en_US
dc.conference.name28th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationDenver, Colorado, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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