Weight Body Composition Changes in Premenopausal Women Receiving Adjuvant Chemotherapy for Breast Cancer

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165404
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Weight Body Composition Changes in Premenopausal Women Receiving Adjuvant Chemotherapy for Breast Cancer
Author(s):
Ingram, Carolyn
Author Details:
Carolyn Ingram, Assistant Professor, McMaster University, Faculty of Health Sciences, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, email: ingramc@mcmaster.ca
Abstract:
Research indicates a decrease in chemotherapy-associated weight gain related to modern breast cancer chemotherapy. However, studies have begun to suggest that there are important body composition changes at this time. This study examined: weight change during adjuvant chemotherapy, changes in body composition, and relationships between body composition and weight change. Brown's Conceptual Framework for Cancer-Related Weight Change guided the research. This prospective, correlational study examined a convenience sample of 91 premenopausal women with Stage I and II breast cancer receiving adjuvant chemotherapy (AC, CEF or CMF) at two clinics in Ontario. Eight AC subjects also received tamoxifen. Most had lumpectomies and Stage II disease. Their mean age was 44 years (SD 5.9). Most were white, married, working, and had some post-secondary education. Data were collected before treatment began, at the start of Cycles 2, 4 and 6 (if applicable), and at the end of treatment. The body composition measure was bioelectrical impedance analysis. Weights and heights were obtained using standardized techniques. Reliability and validity for all measures were well established. Data analysis included descriptive statistics, correlations and regression analysis. Subjects' BMI indicated slight overweight at baseline (M=26 kg/m2, SD 6.6). Of these, 45% were significantly overweight (M=30.7 kg/m2, SD 7.1). Overall, the sample gained 1.4 kg (SD 3.4) during therapy. An increase or decrease of > 2.5 kg defined "weight change." Using this definition, 55% of women maintained stable weights, while 34% gained (M=5 kg, SD 1.4) and 11% lost weight (M=4.2 kg, SD 1.4). Although adult weight gain is primarily associated with increased fat mass, weight gainers in this study also gained lean body mass (54% lean increase for AC, 35% for CMF and 19% for CEF subjects). These findings lay the groundwork for targeting interventions to treatment, weight and body composition profiles.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2003
Conference Name:
28th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Denver, Colorado, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWeight Body Composition Changes in Premenopausal Women Receiving Adjuvant Chemotherapy for Breast Canceren_GB
dc.contributor.authorIngram, Carolynen_US
dc.author.detailsCarolyn Ingram, Assistant Professor, McMaster University, Faculty of Health Sciences, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, email: ingramc@mcmaster.caen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165404-
dc.description.abstractResearch indicates a decrease in chemotherapy-associated weight gain related to modern breast cancer chemotherapy. However, studies have begun to suggest that there are important body composition changes at this time. This study examined: weight change during adjuvant chemotherapy, changes in body composition, and relationships between body composition and weight change. Brown's Conceptual Framework for Cancer-Related Weight Change guided the research. This prospective, correlational study examined a convenience sample of 91 premenopausal women with Stage I and II breast cancer receiving adjuvant chemotherapy (AC, CEF or CMF) at two clinics in Ontario. Eight AC subjects also received tamoxifen. Most had lumpectomies and Stage II disease. Their mean age was 44 years (SD 5.9). Most were white, married, working, and had some post-secondary education. Data were collected before treatment began, at the start of Cycles 2, 4 and 6 (if applicable), and at the end of treatment. The body composition measure was bioelectrical impedance analysis. Weights and heights were obtained using standardized techniques. Reliability and validity for all measures were well established. Data analysis included descriptive statistics, correlations and regression analysis. Subjects' BMI indicated slight overweight at baseline (M=26 kg/m2, SD 6.6). Of these, 45% were significantly overweight (M=30.7 kg/m2, SD 7.1). Overall, the sample gained 1.4 kg (SD 3.4) during therapy. An increase or decrease of > 2.5 kg defined "weight change." Using this definition, 55% of women maintained stable weights, while 34% gained (M=5 kg, SD 1.4) and 11% lost weight (M=4.2 kg, SD 1.4). Although adult weight gain is primarily associated with increased fat mass, weight gainers in this study also gained lean body mass (54% lean increase for AC, 35% for CMF and 19% for CEF subjects). These findings lay the groundwork for targeting interventions to treatment, weight and body composition profiles.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:17:56Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:17:56Z-
dc.conference.date2003en_US
dc.conference.name28th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationDenver, Colorado, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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