2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165405
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Who Benefits From Energy Conservation for Cancer-Related Fatigue?
Author(s):
Barsevick, Andrea; Dudley, W.; Nail, L.; Beck, S.
Author Details:
Andrea Barsevick, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, email: AM_Barsevick@fccc.edu; W. Dudley; L. Nail; S. Beck
Abstract:
The purpose of this secondary analysis of data from a randomized clinical trial (RCT) was to identify characteristics that predict benefit from an energy conservation/activity management (ECAM) intervention for cancer-related fatigue. The Common Sense Model provided the conceptual basis for the RCT. Valid and reliable measures were used to evaluate fatigue at baseline and two follow-up points of expected high fatigue. The RCT demonstrated that teaching energy conservation (delegation, priority setting, pacing oneself, and planning activities at times of peak energy) benefited a diverse sample of 396 men and women. The ECAM group reported less fatigue, distress, and impact than a comparison group. Given the positive result, it is essential to identify patient characteristics that will enable busy clinicians to target individuals most likely to benefit from this intervention. The secondary analysis included 111 participants in the ECAM group who completed measures at all three data points. Multiple regression with residual analysis was used to create a dichotomous variable indicating high or low change in fatigue scores. Change scores indicated greater or less benefit from the ECAM intervention. Chi-square and t-tests were used to evaluate demographic (age, education, marital or work status), clinical (diagnosis, disease stage, performance status, treatment type, or side effects), and behavioral characteristics (baseline function in usual activities, sleep disturbance, and mood disturbance) as candidate predictors of benefit from the intervention. Only cancer treatment group (p=.001) and functional performance of household duties (.01) distinguished the groups with greater or less benefit from the intervention. More than two thirds of those in the high benefit group (71%) had been treated with RT compared with 29% of those receiving CTX/concurrent therapy. Persons in the high benefit group had significantly better baseline performance of household activities than the low benefit group. The findings indicate that persons receiving less intensive therapy such as RT and those who start out with higher baseline functioning are most likely to benefit from the ECAM intervention. The results suggest that persons treated with intensive therapy or whose usual functioning is compromised at the start of therapy may require more intensive or more comprehensive symptom management.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2003
Conference Name:
28th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Denver, Colorado, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWho Benefits From Energy Conservation for Cancer-Related Fatigue?en_GB
dc.contributor.authorBarsevick, Andreaen_US
dc.contributor.authorDudley, W.en_US
dc.contributor.authorNail, L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBeck, S.en_US
dc.author.detailsAndrea Barsevick, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, email: AM_Barsevick@fccc.edu; W. Dudley; L. Nail; S. Becken_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165405-
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this secondary analysis of data from a randomized clinical trial (RCT) was to identify characteristics that predict benefit from an energy conservation/activity management (ECAM) intervention for cancer-related fatigue. The Common Sense Model provided the conceptual basis for the RCT. Valid and reliable measures were used to evaluate fatigue at baseline and two follow-up points of expected high fatigue. The RCT demonstrated that teaching energy conservation (delegation, priority setting, pacing oneself, and planning activities at times of peak energy) benefited a diverse sample of 396 men and women. The ECAM group reported less fatigue, distress, and impact than a comparison group. Given the positive result, it is essential to identify patient characteristics that will enable busy clinicians to target individuals most likely to benefit from this intervention. The secondary analysis included 111 participants in the ECAM group who completed measures at all three data points. Multiple regression with residual analysis was used to create a dichotomous variable indicating high or low change in fatigue scores. Change scores indicated greater or less benefit from the ECAM intervention. Chi-square and t-tests were used to evaluate demographic (age, education, marital or work status), clinical (diagnosis, disease stage, performance status, treatment type, or side effects), and behavioral characteristics (baseline function in usual activities, sleep disturbance, and mood disturbance) as candidate predictors of benefit from the intervention. Only cancer treatment group (p=.001) and functional performance of household duties (.01) distinguished the groups with greater or less benefit from the intervention. More than two thirds of those in the high benefit group (71%) had been treated with RT compared with 29% of those receiving CTX/concurrent therapy. Persons in the high benefit group had significantly better baseline performance of household activities than the low benefit group. The findings indicate that persons receiving less intensive therapy such as RT and those who start out with higher baseline functioning are most likely to benefit from the ECAM intervention. The results suggest that persons treated with intensive therapy or whose usual functioning is compromised at the start of therapy may require more intensive or more comprehensive symptom management.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:17:57Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:17:57Z-
dc.conference.date2003en_US
dc.conference.name28th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationDenver, Colorado, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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