2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165406
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Clinical Insights Shared by Nurse Cancer Survivors
Author(s):
Agretelis, Joan; Picard, C.; DeMarco, R.
Author Details:
Joan Agretelis, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA; C. Picard; R. DeMarco
Abstract:
Accounts on the cancer survivorship experience of healthcare professionals are anecdotal, told in essays in professional journals, electronic list serve discussions, or published autobiographical accounts, but to date have not been systematically explored (Fedora, 1985; Frank, 1992; Hamilton, 1999; Leigh, 1992; Mullan, 1986; Nally, 1999; Reinhardt, 2000; Scannell, 1985; Wagner, 1996). Nurse cancer survivors live in two worlds: that of patient and that of healthcare professional. From this perspective as “dual insider” nurse cancer survivors provide a rich understanding of the process of receiving care and negotiating the systems of care delivery. The purpose of this study was to explore the personal and professional experience of cancer survivorship among a group of nurses. It was conducted in a two-step interview process guided by Caring Theory as described by Watson and Newman. This presentation will focus on the participants’ responses to the second research question regarding the professional impact of cancer survivorship. Within the professional realm, four themes were identified and included 1) increased level of compassion, 2) advocacy for change, 3) disclosure, and 4) volunteerism. Study participants related personal care encounters and experiences with the care-delivery system that provide clinical insight and present challenges to their colleagues. Participants’ accounts are used to highlight the clinical wisdom that nurses took from their personal cancer experience and can be used to inform oncology nursing practice. Examples of exquisite, and absent, care from healthcare providers and colleagues underscore the significance of communication and empathy in delivering care. Descriptions of multiple dimensions of advocacy demonstrate how nurses can influence the healthcare system. Participants’ reports of how, and under what circumstances, they disclosed their own cancer experience with others, including their patients, show the value that nurses place on being with another human being in the caring moment. Participants’ thoughtful reflection of their personal experiences with cancer and cancer treatment contribute pragmatic guidance that is applicable across the spectrum of nursing practice.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2003
Conference Name:
28th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Denver, Colorado, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleClinical Insights Shared by Nurse Cancer Survivorsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorAgretelis, Joanen_US
dc.contributor.authorPicard, C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDeMarco, R.en_US
dc.author.detailsJoan Agretelis, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA; C. Picard; R. DeMarcoen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165406-
dc.description.abstractAccounts on the cancer survivorship experience of healthcare professionals are anecdotal, told in essays in professional journals, electronic list serve discussions, or published autobiographical accounts, but to date have not been systematically explored (Fedora, 1985; Frank, 1992; Hamilton, 1999; Leigh, 1992; Mullan, 1986; Nally, 1999; Reinhardt, 2000; Scannell, 1985; Wagner, 1996). Nurse cancer survivors live in two worlds: that of patient and that of healthcare professional. From this perspective as “dual insider” nurse cancer survivors provide a rich understanding of the process of receiving care and negotiating the systems of care delivery. The purpose of this study was to explore the personal and professional experience of cancer survivorship among a group of nurses. It was conducted in a two-step interview process guided by Caring Theory as described by Watson and Newman. This presentation will focus on the participants’ responses to the second research question regarding the professional impact of cancer survivorship. Within the professional realm, four themes were identified and included 1) increased level of compassion, 2) advocacy for change, 3) disclosure, and 4) volunteerism. Study participants related personal care encounters and experiences with the care-delivery system that provide clinical insight and present challenges to their colleagues. Participants’ accounts are used to highlight the clinical wisdom that nurses took from their personal cancer experience and can be used to inform oncology nursing practice. Examples of exquisite, and absent, care from healthcare providers and colleagues underscore the significance of communication and empathy in delivering care. Descriptions of multiple dimensions of advocacy demonstrate how nurses can influence the healthcare system. Participants’ reports of how, and under what circumstances, they disclosed their own cancer experience with others, including their patients, show the value that nurses place on being with another human being in the caring moment. Participants’ thoughtful reflection of their personal experiences with cancer and cancer treatment contribute pragmatic guidance that is applicable across the spectrum of nursing practice.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:17:58Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:17:58Z-
dc.conference.date2003en_US
dc.conference.name28th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationDenver, Colorado, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.