The Experience of Chemotherapy-Induced Neutropenia: Quality-of-Life Interviews With Adult Cancer Patients

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165410
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Experience of Chemotherapy-Induced Neutropenia: Quality-of-Life Interviews With Adult Cancer Patients
Author(s):
Ashley, J.; Taylor, D.; Houts, A.; Fortner, B.; Durrence, H.; Kovacs, A.
Author Details:
J. Ashley, The West Clinic, Memphis, Tennessee, USA; D. Taylor; A. Houts; B. Fortner; H. Durrence; A. Kovacs
Abstract:
BACKGROUND: CIN is a problem for many cancer patients, but its impact on quality of life (QoL) is not well understood, particularly in those cases where patients become neutropenic but never develop fever or other alarming signs of infection. This paper presents the results of a series of structured interviews with adult cancer patients about the effects of CIN on QoL. METHODS: Participation was restricted to cancer patients receiving the first cycle of a 21-28 day myelosuppressive chemotherapy regimen. Absolute neutrophil count (ANC) was assessed on days 7, 10, 14, 21 and 28 (if necessary). QoL interviews commenced when ANC fell below 1.5 x 109/L and at every time point thereafter. The QoL interviews asked about the effects of neutropenia since the previous visit in the following areas: physical feelings and sensations, daily activities, interactions with others, financial impacts, ability to work, sex life, emotions, satisfaction with medical care, thoughts about disease, thoughts about treatment procedures, and overall QoL. All interviews were transcribed and reviewed independently by two reviewers to isolate specific complaints and problem domains. RESULTS: 34 patients developed grade 4 neutropenia and were included in the analysis. 100 QoL interviews (Mode per patient = 4) were transcribed, and two independent raters inductively developed 5 broad categories comprising 80 specific complaint domains. Fatigue was the most common physical symptom and was described in terms of being tired, exhausted, or weak. Interference in daily routine and social isolation were also common complaints that focused on restrictions attributed to being ill and prevention of infection. Patients reported psychological problems including feelings of reduced self-worth associated with inability to fulfill normal roles and feelings of sadness and anxiety about their disease and treatment. DISCUSSION: The results provide a rich description of the perceived impact of CIN on QoL and underscore the need for further consideration of treatments that minimize severity of CIN. Furthermore, the results can serve as a foundation for the development of neutropenia-specific research and clinical measures and guide research methods aimed at better understanding the effects of CIN and the potential benefit of therapeutic and prophylactic treatments for CIN.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2003
Conference Name:
28th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Denver, Colorado, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Experience of Chemotherapy-Induced Neutropenia: Quality-of-Life Interviews With Adult Cancer Patientsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorAshley, J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorTaylor, D.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHouts, A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorFortner, B.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDurrence, H.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKovacs, A.en_US
dc.author.detailsJ. Ashley, The West Clinic, Memphis, Tennessee, USA; D. Taylor; A. Houts; B. Fortner; H. Durrence; A. Kovacsen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165410-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: CIN is a problem for many cancer patients, but its impact on quality of life (QoL) is not well understood, particularly in those cases where patients become neutropenic but never develop fever or other alarming signs of infection. This paper presents the results of a series of structured interviews with adult cancer patients about the effects of CIN on QoL. METHODS: Participation was restricted to cancer patients receiving the first cycle of a 21-28 day myelosuppressive chemotherapy regimen. Absolute neutrophil count (ANC) was assessed on days 7, 10, 14, 21 and 28 (if necessary). QoL interviews commenced when ANC fell below 1.5 x 109/L and at every time point thereafter. The QoL interviews asked about the effects of neutropenia since the previous visit in the following areas: physical feelings and sensations, daily activities, interactions with others, financial impacts, ability to work, sex life, emotions, satisfaction with medical care, thoughts about disease, thoughts about treatment procedures, and overall QoL. All interviews were transcribed and reviewed independently by two reviewers to isolate specific complaints and problem domains. RESULTS: 34 patients developed grade 4 neutropenia and were included in the analysis. 100 QoL interviews (Mode per patient = 4) were transcribed, and two independent raters inductively developed 5 broad categories comprising 80 specific complaint domains. Fatigue was the most common physical symptom and was described in terms of being tired, exhausted, or weak. Interference in daily routine and social isolation were also common complaints that focused on restrictions attributed to being ill and prevention of infection. Patients reported psychological problems including feelings of reduced self-worth associated with inability to fulfill normal roles and feelings of sadness and anxiety about their disease and treatment. DISCUSSION: The results provide a rich description of the perceived impact of CIN on QoL and underscore the need for further consideration of treatments that minimize severity of CIN. Furthermore, the results can serve as a foundation for the development of neutropenia-specific research and clinical measures and guide research methods aimed at better understanding the effects of CIN and the potential benefit of therapeutic and prophylactic treatments for CIN.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:18:02Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:18:02Z-
dc.conference.date2003en_US
dc.conference.name28th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationDenver, Colorado, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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