2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165411
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Contemporary Measurement of Symptom Distress in Women With Breast Cancer
Author(s):
Boehmke, Marcia
Author Details:
Marcia Boehmke, South Campus, Buffalo, New York, USA, email: boehmke@buffalo.edu
Abstract:
Cancer evokes considerable stress from diagnosis through treatment, with each patient’s trek unique. This unique response is known as “symptom distress” and refers to the perception of discomfort as experienced by the individual. Identification and management of patients at risk for high levels of symptom distress is essential because higher levels of distress have been equated with diminished self-care, altered social relationships and decreased adherence to treatment protocols, curtailing survival. A limitation of research to date has been the lack of consensus related to the measurement of the symptom distress construct. To date observable signs and symptoms have received greater attention than the women's response to and coping with the occurrence of these symptoms. Ehlke (1988) points out the women with breast cancer do not experience difficulty breathing and coughing (measured by most symptom distress tools) and omit variables like child-care, marriage and body-image, commonly experienced. One aim of this study was to examine instrument sensitivity in the measurement of symptom distress levels experienced by women with early stage breast cancer undergoing adjunct chemotherapy. The theoretical framework chosen for this study was the Lazarus and Folkman Model of Stress and Coping. This descriptive, correlational, longitudinal study used convenience sampling to recruit 120 women with Stage I and II breast cancer from six socioeconomically diverse oncology settings in Buffalo, New York. The analysis determined that the McCorkle and Rhodes symptom distress scales were highly correlated for all data collection points (r = .90; r = .84; r = .77 respectively), but not correlated with a Visual Analogue Scale measuring anxiety levels (-.042). Anecdotal comments from women suggest that the instruments might not be sensitive measures. The results of this study implicated fatigue, insomnia, body-image, and diminished concentration as symptoms causing women the most symptom distress, however comments made by the women suggest accessing women's perspectives on their total symptom experiences have not been taken into account. A qualitative study is needed to access symptoms most bothersome to these women (taking into account the advent of new therapies/antiemetics, absent when current symptom distress measurements were developed) as well as self-care strategies employed.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2003
Conference Name:
28th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Denver, Colorado, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleContemporary Measurement of Symptom Distress in Women With Breast Canceren_GB
dc.contributor.authorBoehmke, Marciaen_US
dc.author.detailsMarcia Boehmke, South Campus, Buffalo, New York, USA, email: boehmke@buffalo.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165411-
dc.description.abstractCancer evokes considerable stress from diagnosis through treatment, with each patient’s trek unique. This unique response is known as “symptom distress” and refers to the perception of discomfort as experienced by the individual. Identification and management of patients at risk for high levels of symptom distress is essential because higher levels of distress have been equated with diminished self-care, altered social relationships and decreased adherence to treatment protocols, curtailing survival. A limitation of research to date has been the lack of consensus related to the measurement of the symptom distress construct. To date observable signs and symptoms have received greater attention than the women's response to and coping with the occurrence of these symptoms. Ehlke (1988) points out the women with breast cancer do not experience difficulty breathing and coughing (measured by most symptom distress tools) and omit variables like child-care, marriage and body-image, commonly experienced. One aim of this study was to examine instrument sensitivity in the measurement of symptom distress levels experienced by women with early stage breast cancer undergoing adjunct chemotherapy. The theoretical framework chosen for this study was the Lazarus and Folkman Model of Stress and Coping. This descriptive, correlational, longitudinal study used convenience sampling to recruit 120 women with Stage I and II breast cancer from six socioeconomically diverse oncology settings in Buffalo, New York. The analysis determined that the McCorkle and Rhodes symptom distress scales were highly correlated for all data collection points (r = .90; r = .84; r = .77 respectively), but not correlated with a Visual Analogue Scale measuring anxiety levels (-.042). Anecdotal comments from women suggest that the instruments might not be sensitive measures. The results of this study implicated fatigue, insomnia, body-image, and diminished concentration as symptoms causing women the most symptom distress, however comments made by the women suggest accessing women's perspectives on their total symptom experiences have not been taken into account. A qualitative study is needed to access symptoms most bothersome to these women (taking into account the advent of new therapies/antiemetics, absent when current symptom distress measurements were developed) as well as self-care strategies employed.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:18:04Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:18:04Z-
dc.conference.date2003en_US
dc.conference.name28th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationDenver, Colorado, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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