2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165414
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Opioid Prescription for Cancer Pain Management
Author(s):
Chen, H.; Wilkie, D. J.; Huang, H. Y.
Author Details:
H. Chen, University of Washington, School of Nursing, Washington, USA; D. J. Wilkie; H. Y. Huang
Abstract:
The purposes of this study were to describe the appropriateness of opioid prescriptions based on body weight and pain intensity; and to examine if there were gender differences in prescribed opioid dosages. CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK: McGuire’s multidimensional approach model was used to investigate current pharmacological management. Sample: 101 patients were analyzed in this study (45 lung cancer, 44 head and neck cancer, and 12 prostate cancer), including 80 males and 21 females. All subjects reported pain associated with cancer or cancer-related treatment on a categorical scale (from 0: none to 5: excruciating pain). The mean age was 62 years (SD=10). Mean body weight of males and females were 77.14kg (SD=16.73) and 61.0 kg (SD=15.7), which were statistically different (t=3.98, p< .01). Forty-one patients (41%) reported excruciating pain, the others reported horrible (23%), distressing (24%), and discomforting pain (13%). ANALYSIS: t-test, Chi-square test, and ANCOVA were used. FINDINGS: Compared to the AHCPR recommended opioid dosage for body weight, 75 patients (74%) were under-prescribed, and 20 (205) were over-prescribed. Only six males out of 101 patients (6%) were taking appropriate doses. Most of the patients were under-prescribed in each pain intensity level. 28 patients (27.7%) with excruciating pain were taking insufficient opioid doses. After converting into morphine equivalent doses, no gender difference in opioid doses (F= .01, p> .05). Although we failed to find significant results in this study; however, the tendency was found that larger proportion of patients with excruciating pain were taking insufficient opioid doses. IMPLICATION: Due to the difference nature of each cancer diagnosis, more males were recruited, therefore not enough females in the total sample and each group to reach sufficient statistical power. Some issues were identified in this study: (1) The AHCPR guideline only suggested starting opioid dosage based on body weight, whether the titrating dose needs to be based on body weight is still debated. (2) The commonly used equivalency conversion tables are based either on studies performed on patients who received low doses of opioid or on single-dose studies. The significance of body weight and opioid dosage requires further study to ensure better cancer pain management.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2003
Conference Name:
28th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Denver, Colorado, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleOpioid Prescription for Cancer Pain Managementen_GB
dc.contributor.authorChen, H.en_US
dc.contributor.authorWilkie, D. J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHuang, H. Y.en_US
dc.author.detailsH. Chen, University of Washington, School of Nursing, Washington, USA; D. J. Wilkie; H. Y. Huangen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165414-
dc.description.abstractThe purposes of this study were to describe the appropriateness of opioid prescriptions based on body weight and pain intensity; and to examine if there were gender differences in prescribed opioid dosages. CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK: McGuire&rsquo;s multidimensional approach model was used to investigate current pharmacological management. Sample: 101 patients were analyzed in this study (45 lung cancer, 44 head and neck cancer, and 12 prostate cancer), including 80 males and 21 females. All subjects reported pain associated with cancer or cancer-related treatment on a categorical scale (from 0: none to 5: excruciating pain). The mean age was 62 years (SD=10). Mean body weight of males and females were 77.14kg (SD=16.73) and 61.0 kg (SD=15.7), which were statistically different (t=3.98, p&lt; .01). Forty-one patients (41%) reported excruciating pain, the others reported horrible (23%), distressing (24%), and discomforting pain (13%). ANALYSIS: t-test, Chi-square test, and ANCOVA were used. FINDINGS: Compared to the AHCPR recommended opioid dosage for body weight, 75 patients (74%) were under-prescribed, and 20 (205) were over-prescribed. Only six males out of 101 patients (6%) were taking appropriate doses. Most of the patients were under-prescribed in each pain intensity level. 28 patients (27.7%) with excruciating pain were taking insufficient opioid doses. After converting into morphine equivalent doses, no gender difference in opioid doses (F= .01, p&gt; .05). Although we failed to find significant results in this study; however, the tendency was found that larger proportion of patients with excruciating pain were taking insufficient opioid doses. IMPLICATION: Due to the difference nature of each cancer diagnosis, more males were recruited, therefore not enough females in the total sample and each group to reach sufficient statistical power. Some issues were identified in this study: (1) The AHCPR guideline only suggested starting opioid dosage based on body weight, whether the titrating dose needs to be based on body weight is still debated. (2) The commonly used equivalency conversion tables are based either on studies performed on patients who received low doses of opioid or on single-dose studies. The significance of body weight and opioid dosage requires further study to ensure better cancer pain management.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:18:07Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:18:07Z-
dc.conference.date2003en_US
dc.conference.name28th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationDenver, Colorado, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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