2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165416
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Causal Attributions of Women With Ovarian Cancer
Author(s):
Donovan, H.; Ward, S.; Blattner, M.
Author Details:
H. Donovan, University of Wisconsin, School of Nursing, Madison, Wisconsin, USA; S. Ward; M. Blattner
Abstract:
BACKGROUND: Approximately 24,000 women are diagnosed with ovarian cancer each year. In 5-10% of cases there is a clear hereditary cause associated with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation. For the remainder, no cause can be determined. Studies have shown that individuals identify causal attributions for their health problems even in the absence of scientific explanation. The purpose of this secondary analysis is to describe the causal attributions of women with ovarian cancer and to determine the association between causal attributions and quality of life. METHODS: 723 members of the National Ovarian Cancer Coalition with a diagnosis of ovarian cancer completed the Illness Perception Questionnaire (IPQ), a valid and reliable instrument that assesses illness beliefs. This reports focuses on the causal attribution subscale of the IPQ, which includes 18 potential causes of illness. Subjects are asked to indicate on a scale of 0 (strongly disagree) to 4 (strongly agree) how much they believe each was a cause of ovarian cancer. In addition, individuals rank the three most important factors they believe caused their cancer. RESULTS: Women were most likely to believe that stress or worry, pollution in the environment, and hereditary factors were causes of their cancer with mean (SD) scores of 2.22 (1.365), 2.11 (1.190), and 2.00 (1.47), respectively. These three factors were also most commonly cited as the most important factors causing women’s ovarian cancer (n=270, 182, 280, respectively). However, these commonly cited factors were not associated with quality of life outcomes. In contrast, less common causal attributions such as “my emotional state” (r=-.22), “my mental attitude” (r=-.19), and “my personality” (r=-.16) were significantly associated (p<.01) with lower quality of life scores as measured by the Life Satisfaction Questionnaire. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS: Some women have attributions for their cancer that are associated with lower quality of life. Some of these attributions may reflect women blaming themselves for the development of their cancer. Nurses can play a role in educating patients on the known risk factors for ovarian cancer and the lack of scientific evidence to support a link between emotions, personality and the development of cancer.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2003
Conference Name:
28th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Denver, Colorado, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCausal Attributions of Women With Ovarian Canceren_GB
dc.contributor.authorDonovan, H.en_US
dc.contributor.authorWard, S.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBlattner, M.en_US
dc.author.detailsH. Donovan, University of Wisconsin, School of Nursing, Madison, Wisconsin, USA; S. Ward; M. Blattneren_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165416-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Approximately 24,000 women are diagnosed with ovarian cancer each year. In 5-10% of cases there is a clear hereditary cause associated with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation. For the remainder, no cause can be determined. Studies have shown that individuals identify causal attributions for their health problems even in the absence of scientific explanation. The purpose of this secondary analysis is to describe the causal attributions of women with ovarian cancer and to determine the association between causal attributions and quality of life. METHODS: 723 members of the National Ovarian Cancer Coalition with a diagnosis of ovarian cancer completed the Illness Perception Questionnaire (IPQ), a valid and reliable instrument that assesses illness beliefs. This reports focuses on the causal attribution subscale of the IPQ, which includes 18 potential causes of illness. Subjects are asked to indicate on a scale of 0 (strongly disagree) to 4 (strongly agree) how much they believe each was a cause of ovarian cancer. In addition, individuals rank the three most important factors they believe caused their cancer. RESULTS: Women were most likely to believe that stress or worry, pollution in the environment, and hereditary factors were causes of their cancer with mean (SD) scores of 2.22 (1.365), 2.11 (1.190), and 2.00 (1.47), respectively. These three factors were also most commonly cited as the most important factors causing women&rsquo;s ovarian cancer (n=270, 182, 280, respectively). However, these commonly cited factors were not associated with quality of life outcomes. In contrast, less common causal attributions such as &ldquo;my emotional state&rdquo; (r=-.22), &ldquo;my mental attitude&rdquo; (r=-.19), and &ldquo;my personality&rdquo; (r=-.16) were significantly associated (p&lt;.01) with lower quality of life scores as measured by the Life Satisfaction Questionnaire. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS: Some women have attributions for their cancer that are associated with lower quality of life. Some of these attributions may reflect women blaming themselves for the development of their cancer. Nurses can play a role in educating patients on the known risk factors for ovarian cancer and the lack of scientific evidence to support a link between emotions, personality and the development of cancer.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:18:09Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:18:09Z-
dc.conference.date2003en_US
dc.conference.name28th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationDenver, Colorado, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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