2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165418
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
African American Women Coping With Breast Cancer: A Qualitative Analysis
Author(s):
Henderson, Phyllis
Author Details:
Phyllis Henderson, Johns Hopkins University, School of Nursing, Baltimore, Maryland, USA, email: phender8@son.jhmi.edu
Abstract:
PROBLEM AND PURPOSE: Breast cancer has been described as a physically and emotionally challenging disease for women and their family members. Coping strategies have been proven vital to the adaptation of breast cancer. Coping strategies for African-American women with breast cancer have not been well defined in the literature. Nurses must be aware of coping strategies utilized by African-American to promote culturally sensitive and culturally relevant health care. The purpose of this study was to determine how African-American women cope with breast cancer. THEORETICAL/SCIENTIFIC FRAMEWORK: The study was guided by the Roy Adaptation Model (1999). The Roy Adaptation Model (1999) described individuals as adaptive systems that were capable of responding to their changing environment through coping processes. METHODS: A descriptive/qualitative design was utilized to conduct this study. Sixty-six African-American women within the southeastern United States participated in focus group interviews. The mean age of participants was 50.2 years old. Qualitative data were collected by tape-recorded interviews utilizing a semi-structured interview guide. A demographic data sheet was utilized to obtain information such as age, marital status and length of diagnosis. DATA ANALYSIS: Data were analyzed by content analysis and frequency distributions. FINDINGS AND IMPLICATIONS: Findings indicated that the most commonly utilized coping strategies included prayer, having a positive attitude, developing a willingness to live, and the use of social support from family, friends and support groups. Many of the participants reported that they sought support groups that were geared towards African-American women with breast cancer because some traditional support groups were not sensitive to their needs and concerns. There were participants that described their experience with breast cancer as a test of their faith and relationship with God. These findings supported the need for nurses to assess the coping strategies utilized by African-American women with breast cancer and develop culturally sensitive interventions to meet their needs and concerns. Future research is needed to determine the relationship between coping strategies and spirituality among African-American women with breast cancer.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2003
Conference Name:
28th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Denver, Colorado, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAfrican American Women Coping With Breast Cancer: A Qualitative Analysisen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHenderson, Phyllisen_US
dc.author.detailsPhyllis Henderson, Johns Hopkins University, School of Nursing, Baltimore, Maryland, USA, email: phender8@son.jhmi.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165418-
dc.description.abstractPROBLEM AND PURPOSE: Breast cancer has been described as a physically and emotionally challenging disease for women and their family members. Coping strategies have been proven vital to the adaptation of breast cancer. Coping strategies for African-American women with breast cancer have not been well defined in the literature. Nurses must be aware of coping strategies utilized by African-American to promote culturally sensitive and culturally relevant health care. The purpose of this study was to determine how African-American women cope with breast cancer. THEORETICAL/SCIENTIFIC FRAMEWORK: The study was guided by the Roy Adaptation Model (1999). The Roy Adaptation Model (1999) described individuals as adaptive systems that were capable of responding to their changing environment through coping processes. METHODS: A descriptive/qualitative design was utilized to conduct this study. Sixty-six African-American women within the southeastern United States participated in focus group interviews. The mean age of participants was 50.2 years old. Qualitative data were collected by tape-recorded interviews utilizing a semi-structured interview guide. A demographic data sheet was utilized to obtain information such as age, marital status and length of diagnosis. DATA ANALYSIS: Data were analyzed by content analysis and frequency distributions. FINDINGS AND IMPLICATIONS: Findings indicated that the most commonly utilized coping strategies included prayer, having a positive attitude, developing a willingness to live, and the use of social support from family, friends and support groups. Many of the participants reported that they sought support groups that were geared towards African-American women with breast cancer because some traditional support groups were not sensitive to their needs and concerns. There were participants that described their experience with breast cancer as a test of their faith and relationship with God. These findings supported the need for nurses to assess the coping strategies utilized by African-American women with breast cancer and develop culturally sensitive interventions to meet their needs and concerns. Future research is needed to determine the relationship between coping strategies and spirituality among African-American women with breast cancer.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:18:11Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:18:11Z-
dc.conference.date2003en_US
dc.conference.name28th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationDenver, Colorado, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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