Hopes, Concerns, and Expectations of Poor People Living With Cancer About Care at the End of Life

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165419
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Hopes, Concerns, and Expectations of Poor People Living With Cancer About Care at the End of Life
Author(s):
Hughes, A.
Author Details:
A. Hughes, Department of Public Health, San Francisco, California, USA
Abstract:
PROBLEM AND PURPOSE: The recent literature documenting the problems of end of life (EOL) care in the United States has largely ignored the experiences of the vulnerable populations who live at the edges of society. Most of the literature related to socioeconomic status (SES) and cancer underscores the greater morbidity and mortality of poor people when compared with more affluent groups (Bradley et al. 2002, Marcella, Miller 2001). Untangling (unconfounding) the effect of race and poverty on cancer related morbidity and mortality is a challenge. No published research has been located that examines the perspectives of poor patients with cancer regarding EOL care; only one clinically based report has been located (Hughes, 2001). This pilot study will explore the experiences of the urban poor living with cancer about care at the end of life. FRAMEWORK: Interpretative phenomenology is the qualitative approach that will be used to uncover the meanings of living with a life-threatening illness when poor and living in an inner city. METHODS: Fifteen adults will be recruited from a medical oncology clinic in public hospital that serves a poor, disenfranchised and culturally diverse community in a western US city. Each participant will be interviewed at least once for up to ninety minutes. DATA ANALYSIS: Interviews will be audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. Open-ended questions and follow up probes will be used to elicit the narratives of the subjects. Interview narratives will be coded for themes. FINDINGS AND IMPLICATIONS: The goal of this pilot study is to evaluate the feasibility of recruiting and interviewing members of vulnerable populations about a topic that is not usually spoken about, living while one's life is ending.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2003
Conference Name:
28th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Denver, Colorado, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHopes, Concerns, and Expectations of Poor People Living With Cancer About Care at the End of Lifeen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHughes, A.en_US
dc.author.detailsA. Hughes, Department of Public Health, San Francisco, California, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165419-
dc.description.abstractPROBLEM AND PURPOSE: The recent literature documenting the problems of end of life (EOL) care in the United States has largely ignored the experiences of the vulnerable populations who live at the edges of society. Most of the literature related to socioeconomic status (SES) and cancer underscores the greater morbidity and mortality of poor people when compared with more affluent groups (Bradley et al. 2002, Marcella, Miller 2001). Untangling (unconfounding) the effect of race and poverty on cancer related morbidity and mortality is a challenge. No published research has been located that examines the perspectives of poor patients with cancer regarding EOL care; only one clinically based report has been located (Hughes, 2001). This pilot study will explore the experiences of the urban poor living with cancer about care at the end of life. FRAMEWORK: Interpretative phenomenology is the qualitative approach that will be used to uncover the meanings of living with a life-threatening illness when poor and living in an inner city. METHODS: Fifteen adults will be recruited from a medical oncology clinic in public hospital that serves a poor, disenfranchised and culturally diverse community in a western US city. Each participant will be interviewed at least once for up to ninety minutes. DATA ANALYSIS: Interviews will be audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. Open-ended questions and follow up probes will be used to elicit the narratives of the subjects. Interview narratives will be coded for themes. FINDINGS AND IMPLICATIONS: The goal of this pilot study is to evaluate the feasibility of recruiting and interviewing members of vulnerable populations about a topic that is not usually spoken about, living while one's life is ending.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:18:12Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:18:12Z-
dc.conference.date2003en_US
dc.conference.name28th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationDenver, Colorado, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.