Quality of Life and Fatigue in Lung Cancer Patients: Does a Seated Exercise Program Make a Difference?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165420
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Quality of Life and Fatigue in Lung Cancer Patients: Does a Seated Exercise Program Make a Difference?
Author(s):
John, Lauri
Author Details:
Lauri John, University of Texas at Austin, School of Nursing, Austin, Texas, USA, email: ljohn@mail.nur.utexas.edu
Abstract:
PROBLEM/PURPOSE: Fatigue has frequently been implicated as a distressing effect of lung cancer and its treatment that negatively affects quality of life (QOL). Studies have shown that walking programs reduce fatigue and improve general well-being in women with breast cancer; however, there are no studies of the effects of modified exercise programs on QOL in lung cancer patients, whose participation in a walking program might be limited due to climate, safety, and/or scheduling concerns. The purpose of this pilot study is to determine the feasibility of a major research study to determine the effects of a seated exercise program on QOL and fatigue in lung cancer patients and to explore strategies used by lung cancer patients to maintain or promote QOL. FRAMEWORK: Roy’s Adaptation Model. DESIGN: Randomized clinical trial with repeated measures. SETTING: Participants will be recruited from oncology clinics in central Texas. The study will take place in participants’ homes. SAMPLE: Twenty lung cancer patients who are beginning outpatient chemotherapy with or without radiation therapy and are medically able to participate in a low to moderate intensity seated exercise program. METHODS: All participants will receive standard instructions about fatigue management; maintain a daily activity diary; and complete the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Lung [FACT-L], which measures QOL in lung cancer patients, and the Fatigue Subscale of the FACT, which measures fatigue, every two weeks for three months. Participants randomized to the intervention group will be given a videotape of a low to moderate intensity seated exercise program and individualized instructions about how to modify exercise intensity and will be encouraged to perform the exercises at least three times per week. Qualitative data regarding all participants’ perceptions of QOL and fatigue as well as strategies used by lung cancer patients to maintain or promote QOL will be assessed at the end of the three-month study period. IMPLICATIONS: Inclusion of a tailored exercise program in chemotherapy teaching for patients with lung cancer may improve quality of life, reduce fatigue, and improve treatment tolerance.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2003
Conference Name:
28th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Denver, Colorado, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleQuality of Life and Fatigue in Lung Cancer Patients: Does a Seated Exercise Program Make a Difference?en_GB
dc.contributor.authorJohn, Laurien_US
dc.author.detailsLauri John, University of Texas at Austin, School of Nursing, Austin, Texas, USA, email: ljohn@mail.nur.utexas.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165420-
dc.description.abstractPROBLEM/PURPOSE: Fatigue has frequently been implicated as a distressing effect of lung cancer and its treatment that negatively affects quality of life (QOL). Studies have shown that walking programs reduce fatigue and improve general well-being in women with breast cancer; however, there are no studies of the effects of modified exercise programs on QOL in lung cancer patients, whose participation in a walking program might be limited due to climate, safety, and/or scheduling concerns. The purpose of this pilot study is to determine the feasibility of a major research study to determine the effects of a seated exercise program on QOL and fatigue in lung cancer patients and to explore strategies used by lung cancer patients to maintain or promote QOL. FRAMEWORK: Roy’s Adaptation Model. DESIGN: Randomized clinical trial with repeated measures. SETTING: Participants will be recruited from oncology clinics in central Texas. The study will take place in participants’ homes. SAMPLE: Twenty lung cancer patients who are beginning outpatient chemotherapy with or without radiation therapy and are medically able to participate in a low to moderate intensity seated exercise program. METHODS: All participants will receive standard instructions about fatigue management; maintain a daily activity diary; and complete the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Lung [FACT-L], which measures QOL in lung cancer patients, and the Fatigue Subscale of the FACT, which measures fatigue, every two weeks for three months. Participants randomized to the intervention group will be given a videotape of a low to moderate intensity seated exercise program and individualized instructions about how to modify exercise intensity and will be encouraged to perform the exercises at least three times per week. Qualitative data regarding all participants’ perceptions of QOL and fatigue as well as strategies used by lung cancer patients to maintain or promote QOL will be assessed at the end of the three-month study period. IMPLICATIONS: Inclusion of a tailored exercise program in chemotherapy teaching for patients with lung cancer may improve quality of life, reduce fatigue, and improve treatment tolerance.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:18:13Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:18:13Z-
dc.conference.date2003en_US
dc.conference.name28th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationDenver, Colorado, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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