2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165423
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Hispanic Perspectives About Beliefs and Remedies for Acute Pain
Author(s):
McNeill, Jeanette; Sherwood, Gwen D.; Palos, G.; Starck, P.
Author Details:
Jeanette McNeill, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, School of Nursing, Houston, Texas, USA, email: jeanette.a.mcneill@uth.tmc.edu; Gwen Sherwood; G. Palos; P. Starck
Abstract:
PROBLEM/STUDY OBJECTIVES: Undertreatment of pain in hospitalized patients has been associated with increased length of stay and adverse outcomes; minority populations experience a higher likelihood of poor pain management. This project sought to describe the acute pain experience, develop and test a culturally sensitive pain outcome measure for Hispanics. FRAMEWORK: Bates’ biocultural model of pain (1987) guided the study representing a melding of the physiologically-based gate-control theory with social learning and social comparison theories to more comprehensively describe the pain experience. METHODS: Using a cross-sectional design, the Spanish tool, the Houston Pain Outcome Instrument (HPOI) was administered to 85 self-identified, postoperative Hispanic inpatients. The Brief Pain Inventory, a demographic form and chart audit of the analgesic regimen was also used to collect data. FINDINGS: The sample was predominantly Catholic and female, with a mean age of 43 years; one third were first-generation immigrants. Participants expected severe pain following surgery (8.7) and 80% relief from pain. Severe pain, and moderate to severe interference with mood, activity and sleep were reported. Regarding their opinions about pain, participants indicated least agreement with a statement about losing respect of others when showing pain (1.8) and most agreement that “. . .pain medicine is the
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2003
Conference Name:
28th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Denver, Colorado, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHispanic Perspectives About Beliefs and Remedies for Acute Painen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcNeill, Jeanetteen_US
dc.contributor.authorSherwood, Gwen D.en_US
dc.contributor.authorPalos, G.en_US
dc.contributor.authorStarck, P.en_US
dc.author.detailsJeanette McNeill, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, School of Nursing, Houston, Texas, USA, email: jeanette.a.mcneill@uth.tmc.edu; Gwen Sherwood; G. Palos; P. Starcken_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165423-
dc.description.abstractPROBLEM/STUDY OBJECTIVES: Undertreatment of pain in hospitalized patients has been associated with increased length of stay and adverse outcomes; minority populations experience a higher likelihood of poor pain management. This project sought to describe the acute pain experience, develop and test a culturally sensitive pain outcome measure for Hispanics. FRAMEWORK: Bates’ biocultural model of pain (1987) guided the study representing a melding of the physiologically-based gate-control theory with social learning and social comparison theories to more comprehensively describe the pain experience. METHODS: Using a cross-sectional design, the Spanish tool, the Houston Pain Outcome Instrument (HPOI) was administered to 85 self-identified, postoperative Hispanic inpatients. The Brief Pain Inventory, a demographic form and chart audit of the analgesic regimen was also used to collect data. FINDINGS: The sample was predominantly Catholic and female, with a mean age of 43 years; one third were first-generation immigrants. Participants expected severe pain following surgery (8.7) and 80% relief from pain. Severe pain, and moderate to severe interference with mood, activity and sleep were reported. Regarding their opinions about pain, participants indicated least agreement with a statement about losing respect of others when showing pain (1.8) and most agreement that “. . .pain medicine is theen_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:18:16Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:18:16Z-
dc.conference.date2003en_US
dc.conference.name28th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationDenver, Colorado, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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