2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165424
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Stability and Validity of the Priorities Index
Author(s):
Padilla, Geraldine; Chernecky, C.; Cooley, M.; Sarna, Linda; Danao, L.; Brown, J.
Author Details:
Geraldine Padilla, University of California-San Francisco, School of Nursing, San Francisco, California, USA, email: geraldine.padilla@nurisng.ucsf.edu; C. Chernecky; M. Cooley; Linda Sarna; L. Danao; J. Brown
Abstract:
BACKGROUND: A key mediator in patient accommodation to life threatening illness is response shift - a change in internal standards, values or conceptualizations to maintain/improve quality of life (QOL). Few measures of response shift exist other than the recall-based “then test.” PURPOSE: To test stability and validity of the Priorities Index (PI), a potential response shift measure developed for this study and operationalized as a change in comparative values of QOL indicators. DESIGN AND METHODS: A multi-site study described the disease experience of 230 women with lung cancer. The 7-item PI measures perceived ability to control pain, fatigue, and difficulty breathing; good appetite; purpose in life; meaningful family/friends relationships; and ability to care for oneself. Patients rank items from most (1) to least (7) important. Reliability is based on PI stability (baseline - 3 months); validity is based on relationships with the Quality of Life Scale-Cancer, Dyspnea Index, and Meaning of Illness scales. RESULTS: On average women were 65, high school graduates, with moderate incomes and Caucasian (16% African American/“other”). Average time since diagnosis was 2 years, over 85% had no recurrence or metastasis. PI item stability was supported by findings from repeated measures covariance controlling the effects of demographic and disease factors. PI item rankings at baseline and 3 months were: caring for oneself 2.2, 2.3; meaningful relationships 2.6, 2.7; purpose in life 3.3, 3.1; able to control breathing 4.7, 4.5; fatigue 5.0, 4.9; pain 5.1, 5.0; and appetite 5.6, 5.7. Significant correlations between PI item rankings and like items on the QOL-CA and dyspnea scales supported criterion-related concurrent validity for meaningful relationships, control over breathing, fatigue, pain and appetite. Wilcoxon signed rank tests supported contrasting groups construct validity for groupings based on comorbidity (0 vs. >1 comorbidities) and meaning of illness (positive vs. negative). Both groupings yielded significantly different distributions of ranks. CONCLUSION: Caring for oneself, was the highest ranked PI QOL indicator. Controlling demographic and disease factors, the measure yielded stable rankings; and differentiated between groups expected to show different patterns of priorities. Next, the PI should be tested when a response shift is expected.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2003
Conference Name:
28th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Denver, Colorado, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleStability and Validity of the Priorities Indexen_GB
dc.contributor.authorPadilla, Geraldineen_US
dc.contributor.authorChernecky, C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCooley, M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSarna, Lindaen_US
dc.contributor.authorDanao, L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBrown, J.en_US
dc.author.detailsGeraldine Padilla, University of California-San Francisco, School of Nursing, San Francisco, California, USA, email: geraldine.padilla@nurisng.ucsf.edu; C. Chernecky; M. Cooley; Linda Sarna; L. Danao; J. Brownen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165424-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: A key mediator in patient accommodation to life threatening illness is response shift - a change in internal standards, values or conceptualizations to maintain/improve quality of life (QOL). Few measures of response shift exist other than the recall-based “then test.” PURPOSE: To test stability and validity of the Priorities Index (PI), a potential response shift measure developed for this study and operationalized as a change in comparative values of QOL indicators. DESIGN AND METHODS: A multi-site study described the disease experience of 230 women with lung cancer. The 7-item PI measures perceived ability to control pain, fatigue, and difficulty breathing; good appetite; purpose in life; meaningful family/friends relationships; and ability to care for oneself. Patients rank items from most (1) to least (7) important. Reliability is based on PI stability (baseline - 3 months); validity is based on relationships with the Quality of Life Scale-Cancer, Dyspnea Index, and Meaning of Illness scales. RESULTS: On average women were 65, high school graduates, with moderate incomes and Caucasian (16% African American/“other”). Average time since diagnosis was 2 years, over 85% had no recurrence or metastasis. PI item stability was supported by findings from repeated measures covariance controlling the effects of demographic and disease factors. PI item rankings at baseline and 3 months were: caring for oneself 2.2, 2.3; meaningful relationships 2.6, 2.7; purpose in life 3.3, 3.1; able to control breathing 4.7, 4.5; fatigue 5.0, 4.9; pain 5.1, 5.0; and appetite 5.6, 5.7. Significant correlations between PI item rankings and like items on the QOL-CA and dyspnea scales supported criterion-related concurrent validity for meaningful relationships, control over breathing, fatigue, pain and appetite. Wilcoxon signed rank tests supported contrasting groups construct validity for groupings based on comorbidity (0 vs. >1 comorbidities) and meaning of illness (positive vs. negative). Both groupings yielded significantly different distributions of ranks. CONCLUSION: Caring for oneself, was the highest ranked PI QOL indicator. Controlling demographic and disease factors, the measure yielded stable rankings; and differentiated between groups expected to show different patterns of priorities. Next, the PI should be tested when a response shift is expected.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:18:18Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:18:18Z-
dc.conference.date2003en_US
dc.conference.name28th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationDenver, Colorado, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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