2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165426
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Chemotherapy-Induced Menopausal Symptoms in Women 21-45 Years of Age
Author(s):
Poniatowski, B.; Grimm, P.
Author Details:
B. Poniatowski, GlaxoSmithKline Oncology, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA; P. Grimm
Abstract:
Breast cancer patients under the age of 40 receiving adjuvant chemotherapy may experience a menopause that is permanent or reversible. If permanent, these women can expect to spend as much as fifty percent of their lives post menopause. Menopausal symptoms and their sequelae can produce physical as well as psychological distress. The purpose of this study was to identify menopausal symptoms and determine the severity of distress produced by these symptoms as experienced by breast cancer survivors, age 21-45 years, who had received adjuvant chemotherapy. The conceptual framework for this study was based upon the Model of Symptom Management (The University of California San Francisco School of Nursing). The symptom experience dimension of this model, which involves perception, meaning and response to symptoms, guided this project. Using a descriptive, cross-sectional, retrospective design, a convenience sample of 28 breast cancer survivors, age 25-45 years, were asked to describe their menopausal symptoms, symptom severity, and the degree of symptom distress using the Menopause Symptom Assessment and the Urogenital Symptom Index. Selected demographic and clinical data were also obtained, including age, income, education, race, marital status, and employment. Clinical data included type of surgery, chemotherapy or radiation therapy received, and use of complimentary therapies for menopausal symptoms. Analysis of the data revealed that menopausal symptoms experienced daily or several times a week include hot flashes (n=14), fatigue and tiredness (n=13), anxiety/nervousness (n=12)and sleep disturbances (n=12). Of these symptoms, the most severe were sleep disturbances and anxiety/nervousness. The most frequently reported urogential symptoms were vaginal dryness (n=17) and urinary frequency (n=11). Subjects had 12-21 years of education and most were employed (71%). The majority were married (79%), white (82%), with 57% reporting an income >$50,000. All had had surgery with 61% having a lumpectomy. Adjuvant treatment included cytoxan/adriamycin (CA) or CA + taxol (76%) and radiation (75%). Minimal use of complimentary therapies for the management of menopausal symptoms was reported.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2003
Conference Name:
28th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Denver, Colorado, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleChemotherapy-Induced Menopausal Symptoms in Women 21-45 Years of Ageen_GB
dc.contributor.authorPoniatowski, B.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGrimm, P.en_US
dc.author.detailsB. Poniatowski, GlaxoSmithKline Oncology, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA; P. Grimmen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165426-
dc.description.abstractBreast cancer patients under the age of 40 receiving adjuvant chemotherapy may experience a menopause that is permanent or reversible. If permanent, these women can expect to spend as much as fifty percent of their lives post menopause. Menopausal symptoms and their sequelae can produce physical as well as psychological distress. The purpose of this study was to identify menopausal symptoms and determine the severity of distress produced by these symptoms as experienced by breast cancer survivors, age 21-45 years, who had received adjuvant chemotherapy. The conceptual framework for this study was based upon the Model of Symptom Management (The University of California San Francisco School of Nursing). The symptom experience dimension of this model, which involves perception, meaning and response to symptoms, guided this project. Using a descriptive, cross-sectional, retrospective design, a convenience sample of 28 breast cancer survivors, age 25-45 years, were asked to describe their menopausal symptoms, symptom severity, and the degree of symptom distress using the Menopause Symptom Assessment and the Urogenital Symptom Index. Selected demographic and clinical data were also obtained, including age, income, education, race, marital status, and employment. Clinical data included type of surgery, chemotherapy or radiation therapy received, and use of complimentary therapies for menopausal symptoms. Analysis of the data revealed that menopausal symptoms experienced daily or several times a week include hot flashes (n=14), fatigue and tiredness (n=13), anxiety/nervousness (n=12)and sleep disturbances (n=12). Of these symptoms, the most severe were sleep disturbances and anxiety/nervousness. The most frequently reported urogential symptoms were vaginal dryness (n=17) and urinary frequency (n=11). Subjects had 12-21 years of education and most were employed (71%). The majority were married (79%), white (82%), with 57% reporting an income >$50,000. All had had surgery with 61% having a lumpectomy. Adjuvant treatment included cytoxan/adriamycin (CA) or CA + taxol (76%) and radiation (75%). Minimal use of complimentary therapies for the management of menopausal symptoms was reported.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:18:20Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:18:20Z-
dc.conference.date2003en_US
dc.conference.name28th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationDenver, Colorado, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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