Total Symptom Score Impact Hospice Patients' Functional Status and Quality of Life

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165428
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Total Symptom Score Impact Hospice Patients' Functional Status and Quality of Life
Author(s):
Raudonis, B.
Author Details:
B. Raudonis, University of Texas at Arlington, School of Nursing, Arlington, Texas, USA
Abstract:
Symptom management is a principle of palliative care. Uncontrolled symptoms, individually, or in clusters, affect the functional status and quality of life of hospice patients. Our lack of knowledge about symptom clusters impedes effective symptom relief. Thus, further research is needed on the impact of symptom clusters. The purpose of this study was to identify individual symptoms and symptom combinations or clusters experienced at end of life and evaluate their relationship with functional performance and quality of life. The UCSF School of Nursing Symptom Management Faculty Group's Model for Symptom Management served as the conceptual framework for this study. The model's broad perspective of symptom management includes three dimensions: Symptom experience, symptom management strategies, and symptom outcomes. This descriptive correlational study focused on symptom outcomes. Participants were English speaking, adult hospice patients not actively dying, and not delirious. The Mini-mental Exam screened for cognitive impairment. Data collection instruments included: Edmonton Symptom Assessment System, Palliative Performance Scale (function), and Missoula-VITAS Quality of Life Index. A convenience sample of 50 hospice patients included 26 females, 24 males. Their ages ranged from 40 to 96 years old, mean was 73 years. Sample was 82% Caucasian, 10% Black and 8% Hispanic. Sixty-eight percent had a cancer diagnosis. Most common cancers were lung (18%), colon (8%) and prostate (8%). Thirty-two percent had non-cancer diagnoses. Most prevalent non-cancer diagnoses were CHF and COPD. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics (means, standard deviations, percentages and frequencies) and Pearson correlation coefficients. Results suggest that symptom combinations may have a synergistic effect on quality of life and functional status. There were significant negative correlations between depression, general well-being, and quality of life. However, none of the univariate symptoms remained significant in the multiple regression analysis. The correlations between the total symptom score, quality of life, and functional status remained significant in the negative direction. Findings support the need for more research in order to understand the effects of symptom clusters (3 symptoms) or multiple symptoms (more than 3) on quality of life and functional status.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2003
Conference Name:
28th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Denver, Colorado, USA
Sponsors:
Funding Source: Oncology Nurses Society Foundation/Roxanne Laboratories Research Grant.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTotal Symptom Score Impact Hospice Patients' Functional Status and Quality of Lifeen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRaudonis, B.en_US
dc.author.detailsB. Raudonis, University of Texas at Arlington, School of Nursing, Arlington, Texas, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165428-
dc.description.abstractSymptom management is a principle of palliative care. Uncontrolled symptoms, individually, or in clusters, affect the functional status and quality of life of hospice patients. Our lack of knowledge about symptom clusters impedes effective symptom relief. Thus, further research is needed on the impact of symptom clusters. The purpose of this study was to identify individual symptoms and symptom combinations or clusters experienced at end of life and evaluate their relationship with functional performance and quality of life. The UCSF School of Nursing Symptom Management Faculty Group's Model for Symptom Management served as the conceptual framework for this study. The model's broad perspective of symptom management includes three dimensions: Symptom experience, symptom management strategies, and symptom outcomes. This descriptive correlational study focused on symptom outcomes. Participants were English speaking, adult hospice patients not actively dying, and not delirious. The Mini-mental Exam screened for cognitive impairment. Data collection instruments included: Edmonton Symptom Assessment System, Palliative Performance Scale (function), and Missoula-VITAS Quality of Life Index. A convenience sample of 50 hospice patients included 26 females, 24 males. Their ages ranged from 40 to 96 years old, mean was 73 years. Sample was 82% Caucasian, 10% Black and 8% Hispanic. Sixty-eight percent had a cancer diagnosis. Most common cancers were lung (18%), colon (8%) and prostate (8%). Thirty-two percent had non-cancer diagnoses. Most prevalent non-cancer diagnoses were CHF and COPD. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics (means, standard deviations, percentages and frequencies) and Pearson correlation coefficients. Results suggest that symptom combinations may have a synergistic effect on quality of life and functional status. There were significant negative correlations between depression, general well-being, and quality of life. However, none of the univariate symptoms remained significant in the multiple regression analysis. The correlations between the total symptom score, quality of life, and functional status remained significant in the negative direction. Findings support the need for more research in order to understand the effects of symptom clusters (3 symptoms) or multiple symptoms (more than 3) on quality of life and functional status.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:18:22Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:18:22Z-
dc.conference.date2003en_US
dc.conference.name28th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationDenver, Colorado, USAen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipFunding Source: Oncology Nurses Society Foundation/Roxanne Laboratories Research Grant.-
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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