2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165430
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Virtual Reality Intervention for Older Women With Breast Cancer
Author(s):
Schneider, Susan
Author Details:
Susan Schneider, Duke University, School of Nursing, Durham, North Carolina, USA, email: schne021@mc.duke.edu
Abstract:
This pilot study explored the feasibility of using virtual reality (VR) as a distraction intervention with 20 women aged 50 and older that received outpatient chemotherapy for breast cancer at a comprehensive cancer center. Seventy five percent of new cases and 84% of breast cancer deaths occur in women aged 50 and older. Chemotherapy is prescribed to diminish tumor mass and increase disease-free survival. Chances for survival are enhanced if women receive all of the recommended chemotherapy treatments. However, because of chemotherapy-related distress symptoms, patients often have difficulty adhering to the regimen. It is imperative that potentially effective interventions be tested on the elderly since these adults have often been excluded from intervention trials, leading to a gap in the evidence base for care of older adults. With VR, the individual wears a headset that projects images with the corresponding sounds. A computer mouse manipulates the image. For this study, a head mounted display was used to display encompassing images and block competing stimuli in the chemotherapy treatment room. Lazarus and Folkman’s Stress and Coping Model was used to guide the study. A crossover design was be used to determine whether VR was an effective distraction intervention for reducing chemotherapy-related symptom distress in older women. The Symptom Distress Scale, the Revised Piper Fatigue Scale and the State Anxiety Inventory were used to measure symptom distress. For two matched chemotherapy treatments, one pre-test and two post-test measures were employed. Participants were randomly assigned to receive the VR distraction intervention during one chemotherapy treatment and to receive no distraction intervention (control condition) during an alternate treatment. Data collection will be completed Sept. 2002. Final results will be presented. Paired t-tests will be used to test for differences in levels of symptom distress immediately and 48 hours following chemotherapy treatments. An open-ended questionnaire was used to elicit responses regarding the ease of equipment use, length of time used, and effectiveness of VR as a distracter. Preliminary findings suggest that it is feasible to use VR with older adults. Subjective comments suggest that the VR distracter is effective at relieving symptom distress.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2003
Conference Name:
28th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Denver, Colorado, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleVirtual Reality Intervention for Older Women With Breast Canceren_GB
dc.contributor.authorSchneider, Susanen_US
dc.author.detailsSusan Schneider, Duke University, School of Nursing, Durham, North Carolina, USA, email: schne021@mc.duke.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165430-
dc.description.abstractThis pilot study explored the feasibility of using virtual reality (VR) as a distraction intervention with 20 women aged 50 and older that received outpatient chemotherapy for breast cancer at a comprehensive cancer center. Seventy five percent of new cases and 84% of breast cancer deaths occur in women aged 50 and older. Chemotherapy is prescribed to diminish tumor mass and increase disease-free survival. Chances for survival are enhanced if women receive all of the recommended chemotherapy treatments. However, because of chemotherapy-related distress symptoms, patients often have difficulty adhering to the regimen. It is imperative that potentially effective interventions be tested on the elderly since these adults have often been excluded from intervention trials, leading to a gap in the evidence base for care of older adults. With VR, the individual wears a headset that projects images with the corresponding sounds. A computer mouse manipulates the image. For this study, a head mounted display was used to display encompassing images and block competing stimuli in the chemotherapy treatment room. Lazarus and Folkman’s Stress and Coping Model was used to guide the study. A crossover design was be used to determine whether VR was an effective distraction intervention for reducing chemotherapy-related symptom distress in older women. The Symptom Distress Scale, the Revised Piper Fatigue Scale and the State Anxiety Inventory were used to measure symptom distress. For two matched chemotherapy treatments, one pre-test and two post-test measures were employed. Participants were randomly assigned to receive the VR distraction intervention during one chemotherapy treatment and to receive no distraction intervention (control condition) during an alternate treatment. Data collection will be completed Sept. 2002. Final results will be presented. Paired t-tests will be used to test for differences in levels of symptom distress immediately and 48 hours following chemotherapy treatments. An open-ended questionnaire was used to elicit responses regarding the ease of equipment use, length of time used, and effectiveness of VR as a distracter. Preliminary findings suggest that it is feasible to use VR with older adults. Subjective comments suggest that the VR distracter is effective at relieving symptom distress.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:18:24Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:18:24Z-
dc.conference.date2003en_US
dc.conference.name28th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationDenver, Colorado, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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