The Longitudinal Effects of Cancer Treatment on Sexuality in Individuals With Lung Cancer

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165431
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Longitudinal Effects of Cancer Treatment on Sexuality in Individuals With Lung Cancer
Author(s):
Shell, J.
Author Details:
J. Shell, Osceola Cancer Center, Kissimmee, Florida, USA
Abstract:
All cancers have potential to diminish sexual functioning. The purpose of this study was to examine changes in sexual functioning during treatment (chemotherapy only; chemotherapy and radiation therapy) for lung cancer. The extent to which age, gender, social support and mood status affects sexual function was also identified. Bronfenbrenner's ecosystemic model and Masters, Johnson and Kolodny's vector model of sexual desire served as the study's conceptual frameworks. Sexual functioning of lung cancer patients in the two treatment groups was measured pre-treatment, at 2 months and 4 months. Fifty-nine of 84 eligible patients primarily from an out patient cancer center in the south participated in this longitudinal survey study. Sexual functioning was measured by the Derogatis Interview for Sexual Function, Self-Report (DISF, SR), social support by the Social Provisions Scale, and mood status by the Derogatis Affects Balance Scale. The Bonferroni technique, based on Student's t statistic analyzed changes in sexual function, social support, and mood status within the two groups between three points in time. Results indicated that sexual function decreased after treatment, particularly between time one and two (mean decrease, 4.35 points); this was not significant at p = 0.05 jointly. Between time one and two, there was a significant decrease (p= .004) in mood status. There was no significant change in perception of social support over the four months. Independent samples t test analyzed change in sexual function between the two groups and no significant change was realized. Pearson chi-square indicated correlation between the two treatments and cancer type (small cell; non small cell lung cancer) (p = 0.001). Multiple linear regression models analyzed the DISFR, SR raw score and each predictor variable (treatment, age, gender, social support, mood status). Age significantly affected sexual function at all three test points (p = .000, p = .000, p = .030 respectively). Gender at time one, and mood at time one and two significantly affected sexual function (p = 0.05). Social support did not significantly affect sexual function overall, however, it did significantly affect mood status (p = 0.05). Findings revealed that patients' sexual function did worsen with treatment, and a decrease was also related to age, gender, and mood status.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2003
Conference Name:
28th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Denver, Colorado, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Longitudinal Effects of Cancer Treatment on Sexuality in Individuals With Lung Canceren_GB
dc.contributor.authorShell, J.en_US
dc.author.detailsJ. Shell, Osceola Cancer Center, Kissimmee, Florida, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165431-
dc.description.abstractAll cancers have potential to diminish sexual functioning. The purpose of this study was to examine changes in sexual functioning during treatment (chemotherapy only; chemotherapy and radiation therapy) for lung cancer. The extent to which age, gender, social support and mood status affects sexual function was also identified. Bronfenbrenner's ecosystemic model and Masters, Johnson and Kolodny's vector model of sexual desire served as the study's conceptual frameworks. Sexual functioning of lung cancer patients in the two treatment groups was measured pre-treatment, at 2 months and 4 months. Fifty-nine of 84 eligible patients primarily from an out patient cancer center in the south participated in this longitudinal survey study. Sexual functioning was measured by the Derogatis Interview for Sexual Function, Self-Report (DISF, SR), social support by the Social Provisions Scale, and mood status by the Derogatis Affects Balance Scale. The Bonferroni technique, based on Student's t statistic analyzed changes in sexual function, social support, and mood status within the two groups between three points in time. Results indicated that sexual function decreased after treatment, particularly between time one and two (mean decrease, 4.35 points); this was not significant at p = 0.05 jointly. Between time one and two, there was a significant decrease (p= .004) in mood status. There was no significant change in perception of social support over the four months. Independent samples t test analyzed change in sexual function between the two groups and no significant change was realized. Pearson chi-square indicated correlation between the two treatments and cancer type (small cell; non small cell lung cancer) (p = 0.001). Multiple linear regression models analyzed the DISFR, SR raw score and each predictor variable (treatment, age, gender, social support, mood status). Age significantly affected sexual function at all three test points (p = .000, p = .000, p = .030 respectively). Gender at time one, and mood at time one and two significantly affected sexual function (p = 0.05). Social support did not significantly affect sexual function overall, however, it did significantly affect mood status (p = 0.05). Findings revealed that patients' sexual function did worsen with treatment, and a decrease was also related to age, gender, and mood status.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:18:25Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:18:25Z-
dc.conference.date2003en_US
dc.conference.name28th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationDenver, Colorado, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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