Evaluating the Relationship Between Cancer Pain Intensity, Satisfaction With Pain Relief, and Attitudinal Barriers to Pain Management: Another Look

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165433
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Evaluating the Relationship Between Cancer Pain Intensity, Satisfaction With Pain Relief, and Attitudinal Barriers to Pain Management: Another Look
Author(s):
Thomas, M.; Fahey, K.; Douglas, M.
Author Details:
M. Thomas, VA Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, California, USA; K. Fahey; M. Douglas
Abstract:
Despite increased focus on the problem, cancer pain (CP) remains a significant issue. Studies document that although some patients report high satisfaction with pain management, they also report high pain ratings (Dawson et al., 2002). The influence of attitudinal barriers to CP might be a factor in this paradox; research has documented that those with high CP have more attitudinal barriers (Ward et al., 1998). The purpose of this descriptive study was to further test the association between CP intensity ratings, satisfaction with, and attitudinal barriers to, CP management. Stress and coping theory provided the theoretical foundation of the study. Attitudinal barriers were measured by the Barriers Questionnaire (BQ); CP ratings were measured by the Brief Pain Inventory (both with established reliability and validity). The sample of 151 non-hospitalized adults with pain due to cancer or its treatment was predominately male, middle-aged (M=59.8 years; s.d. 12.2), and had a wide variety of cancer types. Patients rated their CP and satisfaction with pain relief using 0-10 numeric rating scales; their average CP over the previous week was rated at 4.7 (s.d. 2.1); worst pain at 6.6 (s.d. 2.3) and least pain at 2.8 (s.d. 2.2). Pain management strategies provided an average relief of 59% (s.d. 30.1%); pain relief satisfaction ratings were similar (M = 6; s.d. 2.9). Current CP and lowest CP ratings were moderately correlated with % relief scores (r = -.40, -.312 respectively; p < .001). However, CP ratings were not well correlated with pain relief satisfaction. BQ subscale and total scores were low; they did not correlate with any of the CP, relief, or satisfaction ratings. A subset of patients (n=44) was interviewed. Qualitative data substantiated earlier findings that many barriers to CP management were based on communication and information issues, and on misunderstandings. In contrast with previous studies, data from this study suggest that pain intensity, satisfaction with pain relief, or attitudinal barriers to CP management may not be well correlated. Further study is needed to understand these relationships. Efforts to enhance patients’ understanding and to improve communication with providers may help patients better manage their CP.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2003
Conference Name:
28th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Denver, Colorado, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEvaluating the Relationship Between Cancer Pain Intensity, Satisfaction With Pain Relief, and Attitudinal Barriers to Pain Management: Another Looken_GB
dc.contributor.authorThomas, M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorFahey, K.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDouglas, M.en_US
dc.author.detailsM. Thomas, VA Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, California, USA; K. Fahey; M. Douglasen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165433-
dc.description.abstractDespite increased focus on the problem, cancer pain (CP) remains a significant issue. Studies document that although some patients report high satisfaction with pain management, they also report high pain ratings (Dawson et al., 2002). The influence of attitudinal barriers to CP might be a factor in this paradox; research has documented that those with high CP have more attitudinal barriers (Ward et al., 1998). The purpose of this descriptive study was to further test the association between CP intensity ratings, satisfaction with, and attitudinal barriers to, CP management. Stress and coping theory provided the theoretical foundation of the study. Attitudinal barriers were measured by the Barriers Questionnaire (BQ); CP ratings were measured by the Brief Pain Inventory (both with established reliability and validity). The sample of 151 non-hospitalized adults with pain due to cancer or its treatment was predominately male, middle-aged (M=59.8 years; s.d. 12.2), and had a wide variety of cancer types. Patients rated their CP and satisfaction with pain relief using 0-10 numeric rating scales; their average CP over the previous week was rated at 4.7 (s.d. 2.1); worst pain at 6.6 (s.d. 2.3) and least pain at 2.8 (s.d. 2.2). Pain management strategies provided an average relief of 59% (s.d. 30.1%); pain relief satisfaction ratings were similar (M = 6; s.d. 2.9). Current CP and lowest CP ratings were moderately correlated with % relief scores (r = -.40, -.312 respectively; p &lt; .001). However, CP ratings were not well correlated with pain relief satisfaction. BQ subscale and total scores were low; they did not correlate with any of the CP, relief, or satisfaction ratings. A subset of patients (n=44) was interviewed. Qualitative data substantiated earlier findings that many barriers to CP management were based on communication and information issues, and on misunderstandings. In contrast with previous studies, data from this study suggest that pain intensity, satisfaction with pain relief, or attitudinal barriers to CP management may not be well correlated. Further study is needed to understand these relationships. Efforts to enhance patients&rsquo; understanding and to improve communication with providers may help patients better manage their CP.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:18:27Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:18:27Z-
dc.conference.date2003en_US
dc.conference.name28th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationDenver, Colorado, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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