2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165434
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Ethics at the End of Life: Autonomy and Control
Author(s):
Volker, Deborah
Author Details:
Deborah Volker, University of Texas at Austin, School of Nursing, Austin, Texas, USA, email: dvolker@mail.nur.utexas.edu
Abstract:
SIGNIFICANCE: The concept of personal control is central in Western bioethics. Control of one's life is closely connected with the concepts of choice and autonomy. Given society's emphasis on personal control, many people value the right to autonomous decision-making in issues involving health, disease, and dying. PROBLEM/PURPOSE: Little is known about the nature of what people wish to have control over in the context of end-of-life care, nor the ways health care professionals assist dying patients to gain desired control. The purpose of this study was to explore an ethical concern at the end of life: a search for autonomy and control in the face of a seemingly uncontrollable situation. A statewide, purposive sample of 8 oncology advanced practice nurses (APNs) and their patients with advanced cancer was used. The first specific aim was to explore strategies APNs use to assist advanced cancer patients to achieve control and comfort at the end of life. Findings for this aim were previously reported. The focus of this report is on the second specific aim: to explore the nature of what patients with advanced cancer want regarding personal control and comfort at the end of life. FRAMEWORK: The study was based on Lewis' conceptual typology of control, which outlines 5 control responses to aversive events, stimuli, or stressors. METHODS: This naturalistic study was based on Denzin's method of interpretive interactionism. Participants include 8 advanced cancer patients referred by their APNs. DATA ANALYSIS: Interviews are being analyzed using Denzin's interpretive process for thematic analysis. Research team members with expertise in qualitative research methods, hospice/palliative care, and bioethics will review transcripts and analytic decisions. FINDINGS AND IMPLICATIONS: Final study results will be presented. Findings can be used to better understand patient preferences for autonomy and control, and improve clinical care within the end-of life trajectory.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2003
Conference Name:
28th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Denver, Colorado, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEthics at the End of Life: Autonomy and Controlen_GB
dc.contributor.authorVolker, Deborahen_US
dc.author.detailsDeborah Volker, University of Texas at Austin, School of Nursing, Austin, Texas, USA, email: dvolker@mail.nur.utexas.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165434-
dc.description.abstractSIGNIFICANCE: The concept of personal control is central in Western bioethics. Control of one's life is closely connected with the concepts of choice and autonomy. Given society's emphasis on personal control, many people value the right to autonomous decision-making in issues involving health, disease, and dying. PROBLEM/PURPOSE: Little is known about the nature of what people wish to have control over in the context of end-of-life care, nor the ways health care professionals assist dying patients to gain desired control. The purpose of this study was to explore an ethical concern at the end of life: a search for autonomy and control in the face of a seemingly uncontrollable situation. A statewide, purposive sample of 8 oncology advanced practice nurses (APNs) and their patients with advanced cancer was used. The first specific aim was to explore strategies APNs use to assist advanced cancer patients to achieve control and comfort at the end of life. Findings for this aim were previously reported. The focus of this report is on the second specific aim: to explore the nature of what patients with advanced cancer want regarding personal control and comfort at the end of life. FRAMEWORK: The study was based on Lewis' conceptual typology of control, which outlines 5 control responses to aversive events, stimuli, or stressors. METHODS: This naturalistic study was based on Denzin's method of interpretive interactionism. Participants include 8 advanced cancer patients referred by their APNs. DATA ANALYSIS: Interviews are being analyzed using Denzin's interpretive process for thematic analysis. Research team members with expertise in qualitative research methods, hospice/palliative care, and bioethics will review transcripts and analytic decisions. FINDINGS AND IMPLICATIONS: Final study results will be presented. Findings can be used to better understand patient preferences for autonomy and control, and improve clinical care within the end-of life trajectory.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:18:28Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:18:28Z-
dc.conference.date2003en_US
dc.conference.name28th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationDenver, Colorado, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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