The Influence of Caregiver Age and Gender, and Patient Clinical Factors on Family Caregivers' Perceptions of and Involvement in Cancer Pain Management

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165438
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Influence of Caregiver Age and Gender, and Patient Clinical Factors on Family Caregivers' Perceptions of and Involvement in Cancer Pain Management
Author(s):
Yates, P.; Skerman, H.; Edwards, H.; Aranda, S.; MacCallum, P.; Nash, R.
Author Details:
P. Yates, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; H. Skerman; H. Edwards; S. Aranda; P. MacCallum; R. Nash
Abstract:
Many family caregivers are actively involved in managing their relative's cancer pain, however little is known about their pain management experiences and their impact on caregivers and patients. Based on the PRECEDE model of health behavior, the purpose of this study was to identify factors which may influence family caregivers' experiences with cancer pain management. A consecutively recruited cohort of 75 family members attending outpatient oncology clinics with a relative who had experienced cancer pain in the past month completed a self-administered survey. The sample had a mean age of 55yrs (SD=13.5), with 75% being female. 68% of the sample rated their family member's average pain in the past week as 5 or higher on an 11-point numeric rating scale. The survey comprised measures of: (1) demographics/medical characteristics (2) pain knowledge; (3) concerns about addiction, side effects, progression; tolerance; (4) perceived difficulty communicating regarding pain; (5) pain management actions. On a scale from 0=none to 10=a great deal, family caregiver's mean knowledge score was 5.5 (SD=2.5), while their mean preparedness and confidence scores were 7.8 (SD=2.5) and 6.8 (SD=2.9) respectively. All family caregivers (100%) stated they wanted to be involved in pain management, although 7% stated they were more involved than they wanted to be, almost 20% reported difficulty talking to their relative about pain, and 14% experienced difficulty giving medication. While no age or gender differences in involvement in pain management were identified, male caregivers reported higher mean preparedness (p<.05) and confidence scores (p<.05) than females. Caregivers over 55yrs reported greater difficulty communicating with health professionals (p<.05) and family and friends (p<.05) about pain than caregiver’s 55yrs or under. Caregivers who rated their relative's pain as 5 or more reported higher levels of distress (p<.001), and lower satisfaction with pain management (p<.01). These findings reinforce the substantial role caregivers have in managing cancer pain in outpatient populations, and that caregivers' experiences may vary depending on age, gender and clinical factors. Further work is required to identify factors influencing caregiver's experiences with pain management, and ways to facilitate caregivers' desired levels of involvement to achieve better pain outcomes.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2003
Conference Name:
28th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Denver, Colorado, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Influence of Caregiver Age and Gender, and Patient Clinical Factors on Family Caregivers' Perceptions of and Involvement in Cancer Pain Managementen_GB
dc.contributor.authorYates, P.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSkerman, H.en_US
dc.contributor.authorEdwards, H.en_US
dc.contributor.authorAranda, S.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMacCallum, P.en_US
dc.contributor.authorNash, R.en_US
dc.author.detailsP. Yates, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; H. Skerman; H. Edwards; S. Aranda; P. MacCallum; R. Nashen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165438-
dc.description.abstractMany family caregivers are actively involved in managing their relative's cancer pain, however little is known about their pain management experiences and their impact on caregivers and patients. Based on the PRECEDE model of health behavior, the purpose of this study was to identify factors which may influence family caregivers' experiences with cancer pain management. A consecutively recruited cohort of 75 family members attending outpatient oncology clinics with a relative who had experienced cancer pain in the past month completed a self-administered survey. The sample had a mean age of 55yrs (SD=13.5), with 75% being female. 68% of the sample rated their family member's average pain in the past week as 5 or higher on an 11-point numeric rating scale. The survey comprised measures of: (1) demographics/medical characteristics (2) pain knowledge; (3) concerns about addiction, side effects, progression; tolerance; (4) perceived difficulty communicating regarding pain; (5) pain management actions. On a scale from 0=none to 10=a great deal, family caregiver's mean knowledge score was 5.5 (SD=2.5), while their mean preparedness and confidence scores were 7.8 (SD=2.5) and 6.8 (SD=2.9) respectively. All family caregivers (100%) stated they wanted to be involved in pain management, although 7% stated they were more involved than they wanted to be, almost 20% reported difficulty talking to their relative about pain, and 14% experienced difficulty giving medication. While no age or gender differences in involvement in pain management were identified, male caregivers reported higher mean preparedness (p&lt;.05) and confidence scores (p&lt;.05) than females. Caregivers over 55yrs reported greater difficulty communicating with health professionals (p&lt;.05) and family and friends (p&lt;.05) about pain than caregiver&rsquo;s 55yrs or under. Caregivers who rated their relative's pain as 5 or more reported higher levels of distress (p&lt;.001), and lower satisfaction with pain management (p&lt;.01). These findings reinforce the substantial role caregivers have in managing cancer pain in outpatient populations, and that caregivers' experiences may vary depending on age, gender and clinical factors. Further work is required to identify factors influencing caregiver's experiences with pain management, and ways to facilitate caregivers' desired levels of involvement to achieve better pain outcomes.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:18:32Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:18:32Z-
dc.conference.date2003en_US
dc.conference.name28th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationDenver, Colorado, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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