2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165440
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Concerns About Pain Management of Young Adults With Cancer and Parents
Author(s):
Ameringer, S.; Ward, S.; Frierdich, S.; Pe Romashko, K.; Buhr, B.
Author Details:
S. Ameringer, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin, USA; S. Ward; S. Frierdich; K. Pe Romashko; B. Buhr
Abstract:
Identifying concerns that young adults with cancer and their parents may have about pain and pain management has been under addressed in research. Purpose: Young adults with cancer have similar and yet quite different concerns and beliefs than do parents. Because parents are actively involved in their young adult’s treatment decisions, it is important to understand the perspectives of both groups. Researchers have identified some concerns of young adults such as a fear of the consequences of reporting pain (unwanted tests), being self-conscious about taking pain medications around friends, and the fear of the loss of independence. Parental beliefs have been reported to be similar to attitudinal barriers to pain management of adults with cancer such as fear of addiction and tolerance, but they also have an intensified concern about respiratory depression. The purpose of this work in progress is to uncover concerns and beliefs that young adults with cancer and their parents may have regarding pain and pain management. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: Leventhal’s Common-Sense Models of Illness Representation is being used as a framework for assessing young adults’ and parents’ concerns regarding pain and how these representations may influence the young adult’s coping behaviors. Methods: Young adults (ages 13-19 years) receiving treatment from a Midwest pediatric oncology clinic and parents are being asked to participate. Two focus group sessions will be conducted with one consisting of six to seven young adults, and the other consisting of six to seven parents. A representational assessment that focuses on ideas about the causes and consequences of pain, and the ability to cure or control pain will be used to guide the discussions in each session. Data Analysis: Based on Klaus Krippendorff’s method, content analysis of the data will be performed within the groups to identify recurring themes related to concerns and beliefs about pain and pain management. Results of the above analyses will be presented. Findings and Implications: An understanding of the concerns of both the young adults with cancer and their parents will help nurses to develop educational interventions to improve pain management.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2004
Conference Name:
29th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Anaheim, California, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleConcerns About Pain Management of Young Adults With Cancer and Parentsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorAmeringer, S.en_US
dc.contributor.authorWard, S.en_US
dc.contributor.authorFrierdich, S.en_US
dc.contributor.authorPe Romashko, K.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBuhr, B.en_US
dc.author.detailsS. Ameringer, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin, USA; S. Ward; S. Frierdich; K. Pe Romashko; B. Buhren_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165440-
dc.description.abstractIdentifying concerns that young adults with cancer and their parents may have about pain and pain management has been under addressed in research. Purpose: Young adults with cancer have similar and yet quite different concerns and beliefs than do parents. Because parents are actively involved in their young adult’s treatment decisions, it is important to understand the perspectives of both groups. Researchers have identified some concerns of young adults such as a fear of the consequences of reporting pain (unwanted tests), being self-conscious about taking pain medications around friends, and the fear of the loss of independence. Parental beliefs have been reported to be similar to attitudinal barriers to pain management of adults with cancer such as fear of addiction and tolerance, but they also have an intensified concern about respiratory depression. The purpose of this work in progress is to uncover concerns and beliefs that young adults with cancer and their parents may have regarding pain and pain management. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: Leventhal’s Common-Sense Models of Illness Representation is being used as a framework for assessing young adults’ and parents’ concerns regarding pain and how these representations may influence the young adult’s coping behaviors. Methods: Young adults (ages 13-19 years) receiving treatment from a Midwest pediatric oncology clinic and parents are being asked to participate. Two focus group sessions will be conducted with one consisting of six to seven young adults, and the other consisting of six to seven parents. A representational assessment that focuses on ideas about the causes and consequences of pain, and the ability to cure or control pain will be used to guide the discussions in each session. Data Analysis: Based on Klaus Krippendorff’s method, content analysis of the data will be performed within the groups to identify recurring themes related to concerns and beliefs about pain and pain management. Results of the above analyses will be presented. Findings and Implications: An understanding of the concerns of both the young adults with cancer and their parents will help nurses to develop educational interventions to improve pain management.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:18:35Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:18:35Z-
dc.conference.date2004en_US
dc.conference.name29th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationAnaheim, California, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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