Effect of a Counseling-Education Intervention on Psychological and Immune Measures in Women at High Risk for Breast Cancer

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165441
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Effect of a Counseling-Education Intervention on Psychological and Immune Measures in Women at High Risk for Breast Cancer
Author(s):
Bagley, J.; Gallucci, J.
Author Details:
J. Bagley, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA; J. Gallucci
Abstract:
The nurse's role here is developing an understanding of relationships between physiological and psychological variables in a high-risk population. Purpose: Approximately 1,975,000 women are living with breast cancer in the United States. First-degree relatives of these women have a 2-3 fold increased risk of breast cancer. This exploratory study examined the relationship between psychological and immune measures in high-risk women and evaluated the effect of a counseling-education intervention. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: The stress response model was used in this pre-post within subject comparative experimental design. Methods: Nineteen women at high-risk for breast cancer were randomly assigned to an immediate (n=10) or a delayed intervention group (n=9). Psychological self-report, hormonal, and immune measures were obtained at baseline and after the immediate group completed four two-hour monthly sessions (Time 2). Psychological measures included Cancer Worry Scale, Impact of Event Scale (IES), Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI) anxiety subscale, and Profile of Mood States. Biologic measures were urinary catecholamine and cortisol, NK cell cytotoxicity, and lymphocyte CD69 and HLA-DR activation antigens after IL-2 incubation. Data Analysis: Nonparametric tests were used to assess correlations, differences between groups, and difference within the immediate intervention group. Findings and Implications: In the immediate intervention group all four self-report measures were lower at Time 2, with anxiety-BSI (z = -2, p=0.045) significantly decreased. There were no significant differences in hormonal or immune measures. The between group comparison at Time-2 showed significant differences in the total IES (u = 20.5, p = .043) and anxiety-BSI (u=17, p=.022). With regard to the relationship between psychological and immune variables, cancer worry was highly correlated with CD69 (rs = .61, p = .014), total-IES was moderately correlated with CD69 (rs = .48, p = .048) but marginally significant with HLA-DR (rs = .44, p =.069). Urinary cortisol was significantly and highly correlated with NK HLA-DR (rs = .61, p=. 023) and marginally significant with NK CD69 (rs = -.50, p = .085). A counseling-education intervention benefited high-risk women in terms of self-reported measures. Some psychological measures correlated strongly with the lymphocyte activation antigens. Larger studies are needed to determine if an education counseling intervention will change hormonal and immune responses in women at high-risk for breast cancer.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2004
Conference Name:
29th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Anaheim, California, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEffect of a Counseling-Education Intervention on Psychological and Immune Measures in Women at High Risk for Breast Canceren_GB
dc.contributor.authorBagley, J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGallucci, J.en_US
dc.author.detailsJ. Bagley, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA; J. Galluccien_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165441-
dc.description.abstractThe nurse's role here is developing an understanding of relationships between physiological and psychological variables in a high-risk population. Purpose: Approximately 1,975,000 women are living with breast cancer in the United States. First-degree relatives of these women have a 2-3 fold increased risk of breast cancer. This exploratory study examined the relationship between psychological and immune measures in high-risk women and evaluated the effect of a counseling-education intervention. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: The stress response model was used in this pre-post within subject comparative experimental design. Methods: Nineteen women at high-risk for breast cancer were randomly assigned to an immediate (n=10) or a delayed intervention group (n=9). Psychological self-report, hormonal, and immune measures were obtained at baseline and after the immediate group completed four two-hour monthly sessions (Time 2). Psychological measures included Cancer Worry Scale, Impact of Event Scale (IES), Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI) anxiety subscale, and Profile of Mood States. Biologic measures were urinary catecholamine and cortisol, NK cell cytotoxicity, and lymphocyte CD69 and HLA-DR activation antigens after IL-2 incubation. Data Analysis: Nonparametric tests were used to assess correlations, differences between groups, and difference within the immediate intervention group. Findings and Implications: In the immediate intervention group all four self-report measures were lower at Time 2, with anxiety-BSI (z = -2, p=0.045) significantly decreased. There were no significant differences in hormonal or immune measures. The between group comparison at Time-2 showed significant differences in the total IES (u = 20.5, p = .043) and anxiety-BSI (u=17, p=.022). With regard to the relationship between psychological and immune variables, cancer worry was highly correlated with CD69 (rs = .61, p = .014), total-IES was moderately correlated with CD69 (rs = .48, p = .048) but marginally significant with HLA-DR (rs = .44, p =.069). Urinary cortisol was significantly and highly correlated with NK HLA-DR (rs = .61, p=. 023) and marginally significant with NK CD69 (rs = -.50, p = .085). A counseling-education intervention benefited high-risk women in terms of self-reported measures. Some psychological measures correlated strongly with the lymphocyte activation antigens. Larger studies are needed to determine if an education counseling intervention will change hormonal and immune responses in women at high-risk for breast cancer.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:18:36Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:18:36Z-
dc.conference.date2004en_US
dc.conference.name29th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationAnaheim, California, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.