Exploring Early Detection Methods: Using the Intraductal Approach to Predict Breast Cancer

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165442
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Exploring Early Detection Methods: Using the Intraductal Approach to Predict Breast Cancer
Author(s):
Baltzell, K.
Author Details:
K. Baltzell, University of California - San Francisco, Dept. of Physiologic Nursing, San Francisco, California, USA
Abstract:
This proposal explicitly addresses different priority issues specific to breast cancer: 1) to find methods to improve earlier detection of breast cancer, 2) to develop models that help identify women at highest risk of developing breast cancer and 3) explore non-invasive methods of breast cancer detection which can be performed by experienced nurses. Purpose: Current methods of breast cancer detection are limited, particularly for women under 50. Looking at atypical cellular cytology from breast fluids may provide more accurate biologic markers from which to assess individual risk. The purpose of this study is to replicate the findings of the only other prospective study of breast cancer in women with known cytologic findings from nipple aspiration. This study showed a significant relationship between the presence of atypical hyperplasia and increased risk of breast cancer development. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: Current theories of breast carcinogenesis and malignant transformation support the notion of breast cells progressing on a continuum from normal to atypical to malignant. Methods: The study will be a historic prospective cohort study. A 15-to 30-year follow-up study will be conducted to determine incidence among women with known breast fluid cytologic findings. Each subject will be classified into one of five cytological categories. Univariate survival analysis will be used to compare the categoric predictor variables with the breast cancer absence or presence of/death from breast cancer. Proportional hazards regression will be used to complete the analysis. Participants to be included in this follow-up are women who were patients of Dr. Otto Sartorius in his Santa Barbara clinic between 1970 and 1990. Dr. Sartorius was a pioneer in breast fluid studies. The total number of patient records available for analysis is 3413. Follow-up methods will be used which are similar to methods used in the Wrensch et al (2001) study. These methods include 1) direct contact, 2) linkage with the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program (SEER) tumor registry data at the California Cancer Registries (CCR), 3) linkage with the Northern California Cancer Center (NCCC), 4) linkage with a national tumor registry, 5) linkage with state of California mortality data and 6) linkage with the National Death Index (NDI). Data Analysis: The study will explore whether or not the presence of DH or ADH are significant in predicting breast cancer development while controlling for age, age at menarch, age at first pregnancy and family history of breast cancer. Proportional hazards regression will be used to determine if the unique contribution of DH and ADH to the hazard ratio is significant while controlling for the variables defined above. Findings and Implications: Study in progress, no conclusions at this time.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2004
Conference Name:
29th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Anaheim, California, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleExploring Early Detection Methods: Using the Intraductal Approach to Predict Breast Canceren_GB
dc.contributor.authorBaltzell, K.en_US
dc.author.detailsK. Baltzell, University of California - San Francisco, Dept. of Physiologic Nursing, San Francisco, California, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165442-
dc.description.abstractThis proposal explicitly addresses different priority issues specific to breast cancer: 1) to find methods to improve earlier detection of breast cancer, 2) to develop models that help identify women at highest risk of developing breast cancer and 3) explore non-invasive methods of breast cancer detection which can be performed by experienced nurses. Purpose: Current methods of breast cancer detection are limited, particularly for women under 50. Looking at atypical cellular cytology from breast fluids may provide more accurate biologic markers from which to assess individual risk. The purpose of this study is to replicate the findings of the only other prospective study of breast cancer in women with known cytologic findings from nipple aspiration. This study showed a significant relationship between the presence of atypical hyperplasia and increased risk of breast cancer development. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: Current theories of breast carcinogenesis and malignant transformation support the notion of breast cells progressing on a continuum from normal to atypical to malignant. Methods: The study will be a historic prospective cohort study. A 15-to 30-year follow-up study will be conducted to determine incidence among women with known breast fluid cytologic findings. Each subject will be classified into one of five cytological categories. Univariate survival analysis will be used to compare the categoric predictor variables with the breast cancer absence or presence of/death from breast cancer. Proportional hazards regression will be used to complete the analysis. Participants to be included in this follow-up are women who were patients of Dr. Otto Sartorius in his Santa Barbara clinic between 1970 and 1990. Dr. Sartorius was a pioneer in breast fluid studies. The total number of patient records available for analysis is 3413. Follow-up methods will be used which are similar to methods used in the Wrensch et al (2001) study. These methods include 1) direct contact, 2) linkage with the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program (SEER) tumor registry data at the California Cancer Registries (CCR), 3) linkage with the Northern California Cancer Center (NCCC), 4) linkage with a national tumor registry, 5) linkage with state of California mortality data and 6) linkage with the National Death Index (NDI). Data Analysis: The study will explore whether or not the presence of DH or ADH are significant in predicting breast cancer development while controlling for age, age at menarch, age at first pregnancy and family history of breast cancer. Proportional hazards regression will be used to determine if the unique contribution of DH and ADH to the hazard ratio is significant while controlling for the variables defined above. Findings and Implications: Study in progress, no conclusions at this time.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:18:37Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:18:37Z-
dc.conference.date2004en_US
dc.conference.name29th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationAnaheim, California, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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