Validating a Self-Report Tool for Assessing Chemotherapy-Induced Diarrhea Symptoms in Colon Cancer Patients

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165444
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Validating a Self-Report Tool for Assessing Chemotherapy-Induced Diarrhea Symptoms in Colon Cancer Patients
Author(s):
Boucher, J.
Author Details:
J. Boucher, University of Massachusetts, Graduate School on Nursing, Worcester, Massachusetts, USA
Abstract:
Chemotherapy-induced diarrhea is a major symptom management problem faced by nurses caring for advanced stage colon cancer patients. CID symptoms can lead to severe toxicity resulting in treatment changes, hospitalization, and morbidity risks. Dose reductions, delays, and discontinuation of chemotherapy leave patients at risk for disease recurrence or progression. An appropriate self-reporting tool to properly identify CID symptoms before severe complications occur is lacking for patient use and nursing assessment. Purpose: The purpose of the study is to validate a self-reporting tool to assess the intensity, frequency, and amount of CID symptoms in advanced stage colon cancer patients. The current NCI Common Toxicity Criteria does not provide comprehensive CID symptom assessment and lacks consistent usage. It is limited to assessment based on number of stools, presence of cramping, nocturnal episodes, and bloody stools. Stool consistency changes and diarrhea complications are lacking in the tool as important descriptors to determine symptom occurrence. Furthermore, CID related symptoms, or diarrhea morbidity assessment of incontinence, tenesmus, abdominal pain, and urgency is needed. Valid stool consistency classification and diarrhea morbidity tools used in other disease populations may have applicability with advanced stage colon cancer patients for CID symptom assessment. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: The Model for Symptom Management developed by the UCSF School of Nursing provides the framework to study CID symptoms from a subjective symptom experience. Focus on determining the symptom experience based on interrelated variables regarding the intensity, frequency, and amount of diarrhea and cancer-related symptoms will occur. Methods: A self-reporting tool based on valid stool consistency classification and diarrhea-related symptom questions will be tested. The tool will be administered to advanced stage colon cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy treatment. Data Analysis: Analysis will include reliability procedures for stool consistency and diarrhea items. Analysis of instrument validity will include face and content validity ascertained from experts in this topic area. Concurrent validity will be evaluated by an independent investigator interview with patients. Findings and Implications: The implications of a self-report CID symptom tool include usage by patients and nurses for earlier symptom recognition, prompt management, and for further research utilization to describe the CID symptom experience in advanced stage colon cancer patients.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2004
Conference Name:
29th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Anaheim, California, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleValidating a Self-Report Tool for Assessing Chemotherapy-Induced Diarrhea Symptoms in Colon Cancer Patientsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBoucher, J.en_US
dc.author.detailsJ. Boucher, University of Massachusetts, Graduate School on Nursing, Worcester, Massachusetts, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165444-
dc.description.abstractChemotherapy-induced diarrhea is a major symptom management problem faced by nurses caring for advanced stage colon cancer patients. CID symptoms can lead to severe toxicity resulting in treatment changes, hospitalization, and morbidity risks. Dose reductions, delays, and discontinuation of chemotherapy leave patients at risk for disease recurrence or progression. An appropriate self-reporting tool to properly identify CID symptoms before severe complications occur is lacking for patient use and nursing assessment. Purpose: The purpose of the study is to validate a self-reporting tool to assess the intensity, frequency, and amount of CID symptoms in advanced stage colon cancer patients. The current NCI Common Toxicity Criteria does not provide comprehensive CID symptom assessment and lacks consistent usage. It is limited to assessment based on number of stools, presence of cramping, nocturnal episodes, and bloody stools. Stool consistency changes and diarrhea complications are lacking in the tool as important descriptors to determine symptom occurrence. Furthermore, CID related symptoms, or diarrhea morbidity assessment of incontinence, tenesmus, abdominal pain, and urgency is needed. Valid stool consistency classification and diarrhea morbidity tools used in other disease populations may have applicability with advanced stage colon cancer patients for CID symptom assessment. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: The Model for Symptom Management developed by the UCSF School of Nursing provides the framework to study CID symptoms from a subjective symptom experience. Focus on determining the symptom experience based on interrelated variables regarding the intensity, frequency, and amount of diarrhea and cancer-related symptoms will occur. Methods: A self-reporting tool based on valid stool consistency classification and diarrhea-related symptom questions will be tested. The tool will be administered to advanced stage colon cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy treatment. Data Analysis: Analysis will include reliability procedures for stool consistency and diarrhea items. Analysis of instrument validity will include face and content validity ascertained from experts in this topic area. Concurrent validity will be evaluated by an independent investigator interview with patients. Findings and Implications: The implications of a self-report CID symptom tool include usage by patients and nurses for earlier symptom recognition, prompt management, and for further research utilization to describe the CID symptom experience in advanced stage colon cancer patients.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:18:39Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:18:39Z-
dc.conference.date2004en_US
dc.conference.name29th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationAnaheim, California, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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