2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165447
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Impact of Depression on Survival of Esophageal Cancer Patients
Author(s):
Chen, M.; Young, H.; Kun, C.
Author Details:
M. Chen, Graduate Institute of Nursing, Chang Gung University, Tao-Yuan, Taiwan; H. Young; C. Kun
Abstract:
The impact of depression on survival of esophageal cancer patients. Purpose: The prevalence of depression among cancer patients has been reported to be 20% to 25%. Although the associations between depression and pain as well as low quality of life are well known, research regarding the long-term effect of depression on survival rate for cancer patients has not been conclusive. The purpose of this prospective longitudinal study was to examine the effect of depression on survival in esophageal cancer patients. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: Lazarus’s cognitive model of emotion was used as the conceptual framework for this study. Methods: The sample consisted of 119 newly diagnosed Stage II to Stage IV esophageal cancer patients treated in a Medical Center of Northern Taiwan. Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) were used to measure depression. The cut-off points for determining the depression status (depressed vs. non-depressed) were established by previous study with Taiwanese cancer population. Each patient was followed for 2 years. Depression status was measured at entry, 2, 4, 6, 12, 18 and 24 month after enrollment. Data Analysis: Data were analyzed using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and Cox regression. Findings and Implications: Results showed that 90 of 119 patients died within the 2-year period with a median survival time of 12 month. One year and two year cumulative survival rates were 63.4% and 51.6% respectively. After controlling for other survival predicting factors (such as degree of body weight loss and functional status), the depression status measured by either HADS or GDS at 4th month significantly predicted patients’ survival; compared to non-depressed patients, the relative hazard ratios for death in depressed patients were 1.75 (HADS) and 3.31 (GDS). The depression status measured by HADS at 6th month was also a significant predicting factor for survival; compared to non-depressed patients, depressed patients had a relative hazard ratio for death of 2.71. This study supports the negative effect of depression on cancer patients’ survival. Oncology nurses should treat depression as an important psychological symptom that warrants early detection, continuous assessment, and appropriate interventions.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2004
Conference Name:
29th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Anaheim, California, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Impact of Depression on Survival of Esophageal Cancer Patientsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorChen, M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorYoung, H.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKun, C.en_US
dc.author.detailsM. Chen, Graduate Institute of Nursing, Chang Gung University, Tao-Yuan, Taiwan; H. Young; C. Kunen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165447-
dc.description.abstractThe impact of depression on survival of esophageal cancer patients. Purpose: The prevalence of depression among cancer patients has been reported to be 20% to 25%. Although the associations between depression and pain as well as low quality of life are well known, research regarding the long-term effect of depression on survival rate for cancer patients has not been conclusive. The purpose of this prospective longitudinal study was to examine the effect of depression on survival in esophageal cancer patients. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: Lazarus’s cognitive model of emotion was used as the conceptual framework for this study. Methods: The sample consisted of 119 newly diagnosed Stage II to Stage IV esophageal cancer patients treated in a Medical Center of Northern Taiwan. Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) were used to measure depression. The cut-off points for determining the depression status (depressed vs. non-depressed) were established by previous study with Taiwanese cancer population. Each patient was followed for 2 years. Depression status was measured at entry, 2, 4, 6, 12, 18 and 24 month after enrollment. Data Analysis: Data were analyzed using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and Cox regression. Findings and Implications: Results showed that 90 of 119 patients died within the 2-year period with a median survival time of 12 month. One year and two year cumulative survival rates were 63.4% and 51.6% respectively. After controlling for other survival predicting factors (such as degree of body weight loss and functional status), the depression status measured by either HADS or GDS at 4th month significantly predicted patients’ survival; compared to non-depressed patients, the relative hazard ratios for death in depressed patients were 1.75 (HADS) and 3.31 (GDS). The depression status measured by HADS at 6th month was also a significant predicting factor for survival; compared to non-depressed patients, depressed patients had a relative hazard ratio for death of 2.71. This study supports the negative effect of depression on cancer patients’ survival. Oncology nurses should treat depression as an important psychological symptom that warrants early detection, continuous assessment, and appropriate interventions.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:18:42Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:18:42Z-
dc.conference.date2004en_US
dc.conference.name29th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationAnaheim, California, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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